DSAE test file

bokkie, noun

Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Afrikaans, kid, bok antelope, goat + -ie.
Note:
All senses are more common in speech than in written contexts.
1. colloquial. An affectionate form of address, usually for a woman; as a common noun, a girl(friend). See also bok sense 3 a.
1959 A. Meiring Candle in Wind 113Someone bumped into her. ‘Sorry, Bokkie,’ he said, leering at her. ‘Where are you going, Bokkie?’ he asked.
1990 [see goosie sense 2].
2. A small antelope; a small goat. See also bok sense 1 a and 2.
1975 S. Roberts Outside Life’s Feast 90She stood soft. A bokkie. Afraid. Listening to me with round eyes.
1993 D. Sülter Informant, GrahamstownIt’s obviously translated from Afrikaans. They talk about some bokkie and its ‘antlers’.
3. A member of the South African Infantry (SAI); the flash and headdress badge (depicting a springbok) of this unit. Cf. springbok sense 2 b and 5.
1975 J.H. Picard in Eng. Usage in Sn Afr. Vol.6 No.1, 36During exercises there is a wealth of typically Afrikaans-inspired English military jargon in evidence: the infantry are called bokkies as a term of endearment, whilst the ‘scorn term’ is bokkoppe toting ketties (rifles).
1985 W. Steenkamp in Cape Times 17 JulyThe Army seems to have a thing about shrinking headdress badges, even though these are potent tools for generating unit spirit. The Infantry Corps used to wear a large ‘bokkie’ which is now half its previous size and almost invisible.
An affectionate form of address, usually for a woman; as a common noun, a girl(friend).
A small antelope; a small goat.
A member of the South African Infantry (SAI); the flash and headdress badge (depicting a springbok) of this unit.

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19591993