bokkie, noun

Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Afrikaans, kid, bok antelope, goat + -ie.
Note:
All senses are more common in speech than in written contexts.
1. colloquial. An affectionate form of address, usually for a woman; as a common noun, a girl(friend). See also bok sense 3 a.
1959 A. Meiring Candle in Wind 113Someone bumped into her. ‘Sorry, Bokkie,’ he said, leering at her. ‘Where are you going, Bokkie?’ he asked.
1963 A.M. Louw 20 Days 91‘No, no, bokkie..,’ he said imploringly. ‘I didn’t mean that. Come, come and let me love you.’
1963 A. Fugard Blood Knot (1968) 115Morris:..Now imagine, if there was a woman, and you want to say something to her, what would you say? Go on. Zach: Cookie..or..Bokkie.
1977 D. Muller Whitey 81She..laid her head against his chest. ‘Not now, Bokkie,’ she said softly. ‘I’m so tired. Please let me go.’
1980 E. Patel They Came at Dawn 48Can’t you see that blerry whitey, met a black bokkie?..See them kissing.
1982 D. Kramer Short Back & Sides 61I need new tyres, need new shocks, Need to phone my bokkie from that tickey box.
1990 R. Gool Cape Town Coolie 59I ’eard you living in the Cape now...Ow’s all those Coloured bokkies?
1990 [see goosie sense 2].
2. A small antelope; a small goat. See also bok sense 1 a and 2.
1975 S. Roberts Outside Life’s Feast 90She stood soft. A bokkie. Afraid. Listening to me with round eyes.
1993 D. Sülter Informant, GrahamstownIt’s obviously translated from Afrikaans. They talk about some bokkie and its ‘antlers’.
3. A member of the South African Infantry (SAI); the flash and headdress badge (depicting a springbok) of this unit. Cf. springbok sense 2 b and 5.
1975 J.H. Picard in Eng. Usage in Sn Afr. Vol.6 No.1, 36During exercises there is a wealth of typically Afrikaans-inspired English military jargon in evidence: the infantry are called bokkies as a term of endearment, whilst the ‘scorn term’ is bokkoppe toting ketties (rifles).
1985 W. Steenkamp in Cape Times 17 JulyThe Army seems to have a thing about shrinking headdress badges, even though these are potent tools for generating unit spirit. The Infantry Corps used to wear a large ‘bokkie’ which is now half its previous size and almost invisible.
An affectionate form of address, usually for a woman; as a common noun, a girl(friend).
A small antelope; a small goat.
A member of the South African Infantry (SAI); the flash and headdress badge (depicting a springbok) of this unit.
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19591993