tin, noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special sense of general English.
colloquial
Corrugated iron, used either for roofing, or for the walls of houses. Also attributive. See also blik-huis, zinc.
1897 R.S.S. Baden-Powell Matabele Campaign 10 (Pettman)Into Mafeking? Well, there’s a little tin (corrugated iron) house and a goods’ shed to form the station.
1897 E. Edwards Journey through S. Afr. 48 (Jeffreys)Kimberley struck me as a very peculiarly built town, being chiefly composed of buildings into whose construction corrugated iron largely entered;..it would not be out of place to refer to Kimberley as a ‘tin town’.
1913 C. Pettman Africanderisms 503Tin house, A house the exterior of which is composed entirely of corrugated iron.
1964 M.G. McCoy Informant, Port ElizabethHe, if you please, feels humiliated at having to live under a tin roof.
1969 M.W. Spilhaus Doorstep-Baby 115It’s a big sprawling house with a tin roof — corrugated iron, you know. We call them tin roofs.
1991 Frontline May 5They see a person staying in a tin house, they take chances by taking for granted that the home is not well-protected traditionally.
Corrugated iron, used either for roofing, or for the walls of houses. Also attributive.

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18971991