DSAE test file

sweet, adjective

Origin:
Dutch
1. ?obsolete. a. Of vegetation: nutritious, and suitable for year-round use as pasture. b. Of land: bearing such vegetation. Cf. sour sense 1.
1786 G. Forster tr. of A. Sparrman’s Voy. to Cape of G.H. I. 345This tract of land seems to come under the character I have given of the Sweet grass-fields and plains towards the shore.
1905 E.A. Nobbs in Flint & Gilchrist Science in S. Afr. 383The two phrases ‘sweet’ and ‘sour,’ as applied to our natural pasture land, have no connection with the usual English acceptation of the words. ‘Sweet’ implies rich land producing nutritious food whether natural or cultivated.
2. Special collocations
sweet-field, sweet-fields noun, obsolete, sweetveld (see below);
sweet grass noun phrase, nutritious grass (see quotation 1913); also attributive;
sweetveld /-felt/, /fɛlt/ noun, formerly also sweet-feldt, sweetveldt, and with initial capital [probably partial translation of Dutch zoeteveld], land providing nutritious grazing; the vegetation on such land; also attributive; cf. sourveld (see sour sense 2); see also mixed veld.
1786 G. Forster tr. of A. Sparrman’s Voy. to Cape of G.H. I. 250By the Sweet-fields (Zoete-velden) are meant such places as do not correspond to the descriptions given above of the Zuure and Carrow-veld.
1992 [see mixed veld].
nutritious, and suitable for year-round use as pasture.
bearing such vegetation.

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17861992