DSAE test file

sour, adjective

Origin:
Dutch, English, South African EnglishShow more Translation of Dutch zuur. The dialectal use in general English emphasizes palatability; in South African English the word refers to nutritional value: animals will eat sour grass, but become thin or ill.
1. ?obsolete. a. Of vegetation: coarse and lacking in nutritional value, especially during winter. b. Of land: bearing such vegetation. Cf. sweet.
1786 G. Forster tr. of A. Sparrman’s Voy. to Cape of G.H. II. 77The district round about, was of the kind called Sour.
1905 [see sweet sense 1].
2. combinations
sour-field, sour-fields obsolete [calque formed on South African Dutch zuurveld, see zuurveld], sourveld (see below);
sour grass, also with initial capitals, grass lacking in nutrition; also attributive; see also koperdraad;
sourveld, formerly also sour veldt [partial translation of South African Dutch zuurveld], land (usually in areas of relatively high rainfall) on which the dominant vegetation is sour grass; the vegetation on such land; zuurveld sense a; also attributive; cf. sweetveld (see sweet sense 2).
1786 G. Forster tr. of A. Sparrman’s Voy. to Cape of G.H. I. 249What are termed by the colonists Zuure-velden, or Sour-fields, are such as lie somewhat higher and cooler than the shore.
1986 Farmer’s Weekly 13 June 19Reasonable palatability may extend into winter even in sourveld areas.
coarse and lacking in nutritional value, especially during winter.
bearing such vegetation.

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

17861986