japie, noun

Forms:
jaapie, jarpieShow more Also jaapie, jarpie, yarpie, yarpy, and (frequently) with initial capital.
Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Afrikaans personal name Japie, diminutive of Jaap ‘Jake’, derived from Jakobus James.
derogatory
1. A contemptuous name for an Afrikaner.
1949 O. Walker Wanton City 104Peter had the slighting word ‘rooinek’ flung in his ear...But the insult was either intended for, or intercepted by, another young man on his left, who halted and snarled something about ‘bloody Japies’.
1968 Eng. Alive 63Another question that might be asked here is why do people refer to the Afrikaans speaking population of South Africa as ‘Dutchmen’ or ‘Japies’.
1980 D. Beckett in Bloody Horse No.2, 14They’ve taken up with some new kids along the road who come from Welkom or somewhere and hardly even speak any English. You wouldn’t believe what Simon talks like now. He sounds like a real little Japie.
2. transferred sense. A jocular, affectionate, or derogatory term for a South African.
Note:
Although presented by some South Africans as a term which is current in world English, no examples of the word in use by non-South Africans have been found.
1956 H. Kops Veld, City & Sea 30He’d had a fight with two South Africans. He’d cleaned them up, he said. Said he hated ‘bloody jaapies’.
1970 R. Nixon Informant, KwaZulu-NatalYarpy. English name for a South African.
1981 Sunday Times 6 Dec. 1They left for Britain, where the couple managed to get a ‘cold, damp flat’ in the centre of Liverpool which they called ‘Japies’ Corner’ to remind them of home.
1986 Frontline Mar. 34G’day, mate. Yer new around here. Where yer from? Morning. I’m from er, South Africa actually. A Yarpie, huh.
3. A yokel, an unsophisticated person, especially one from the rural areas; a low-class person; gawie; jaap. See also plaasjapie.
1964 J. Meintjes Manor House 119They referred to the backvelders as duine-molle, japies, takhare, gawies and so on.
1968 M. Doyle Impala 101He was a thirteen-year-old scholar and not a little bywoner ‘Japie’.
1984 Sunday Tribune 22 July (Today) 4We encountered many people who thought we were absolutely stark raving mad to go and muck about in the wilds...Not only were you nuts but you were considered low-class: as in ‘these Japies obviously can’t afford to live in a hotel’.
1990 C. Laffeaty Far Forbidden Plains 508Abel was a japie from the farm with cow dung between his toes and didn’t understand the ways of sophisticated city men.
1990 D. Kramer in Sunday Times 5 Aug. 13It’s part of the South African identity to dress like a Japie and speak with a guttural accent.
A contemptuous name for an Afrikaner.
A jocular, affectionate, or derogatory term for a South African.
A yokel, an unsophisticated person, especially one from the rural areas; a low-class person; gawie; jaap.
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19491990