DSAE test file

endorse, verb transitive

Origin:
See quotation 1962.
historical
In the phrase to endorse (someone) out, to order (a black person) to leave an urban area because certain requirements of the Native Laws Amendment Act of 1952, or subsequent Acts, were not met by that person (see quotation 1963). Usually passive. Also transferred sense.
Note:
A person endorsed out of an urban area was expected to ‘return’ to the rural area or ‘homeland’ set aside for occupation by his or her ethnic group. See also homeland sense 1, influx control, pass sense 3.
1959 M. Horrell Racialism & Trade Unions 14Dubbed an ‘agitator’, dismissed from his job, and, possibly, ‘endorsed out’ of the area concerned.
1990 R. Malan My Traitor’s Heart 51A black breadwinner had died, and his survivors were being evicted from their township house and ‘endorsed out’ to the homelands.
In the phrase to endorse (someone) out, to order (a black person) to leave an urban area because certain requirements of the Native Laws Amendment Act of 1952, or subsequent Acts, were not met by that person (see quotation 1963). Usually passive. Also transferred sense.
Derivatives:
Hence endorsement out noun phrase; endorse-out adjective (rare, perhaps nonce), see quotation 1972; endorsing out verbal noun phrase.
1964 M. Benson Afr. Patriots 265‘Endorsing out’ was the Government’s euphemism for driving out Africans from urban areas to reserves under the notorious Section 10 of the Urban Areas Act.
1973 M. Van Biljon in Star 30 June 6Endorsing all the Black women and children out of White areas..was a proposition that was carried almost unanimously.

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19591990