dagha, noun

Forms:
daager, dagaShow more Also daager, daga, dagga, dagher, daka, dargha, dargher, dugga.
Origin:
Afrikaans, Zulu, XhosaShow more Afrikaans, adaptation of Zulu and Xhosa udaka mud, clay, mortar.
a. Building mortar, used for laying bricks and for plastering walls and floors, previously made chiefly of mud or ant-hill soil and sometimes mixed with cow-dung and/or blood; now often a mixture of soil, sand, and lime. Also attributive. See also dagha-boy (boy sense 1 b). Cf. misvloer (see mis sense 3).
1879 R.J. Atcherley Trip to Boërland 215This daager is a great South African institution; it consists of a mixture of blood and cow-dung, which is smeared daily upon the floor, and is the only means by which the fleas can be kept under.
1880 H.M. Prichard Friends & Foes 282Kafir women are now summoned, who smear the walls and floor with ‘dargha’ (dried manure), and work up the surface with crushed ant-heap.
c1881 A. Douglass Ostrich Farming 230Mortar dagga (that is, clay worked up the same as for making bricks).
1896 H.L. Tangye In New S. Afr. 326The inhabitants adapted themselves..to the practice of the country, and lived in dagher huts.
1899 Natal Agric. Jrnl 31 Mar. 4‘Daga,’ the mud which is used for mortar is a well-known word wherever buildings are being erected.
1903 D. Blackburn Burgher Quixote 229The floor,..as in all old Boer houses, was of dagga or ant-hill earth, made black, hard, and shiny with bullock’s blood.
1918 C. Garstin Sunshine Settlers 136You put up a good stout house of dagga plastered on a heavy skeleton of planted poles, thatched it over with the best assorted river-grass.
1931 F.C. Slater Secret Veld 153His two assistants were hard pressed to keep him supplied with stones and dagga.
1937 S. Cloete Turning Wheels 166Earth was mixed with water, the Kaffirs turning it with their shovels and finally tramping it with bare feet till it reached the consistency of thick whipped cream. This dagga they flung against the rough wood poles, filling in the spaces between them, and finally plastering the whole, inside and out. The floor was also made of dagga and finished off with a layer of cow dung mixed with blood.
1963 R. Lewcock Early 19th C. Archit. 378For many years it was disputed whether lime mortar or ‘dagga’ (clay mortar) was the more resistant to moisture.
1984 D. Beckett in Frontline Mar. 29First stop was Motlana’s birthplace. The house then, he said, had been a humble cottage with dagha walls and thatched roof (‘the best kind, cool in summer and warm in winter’).
1992 A. Bodenstein in Grocott’s Mail 21 July 1It was a daga structure with wood and iron roof.
b. In the phrr. dagha-and-pole, pole-and-dagha, usually attributive, descriptive of a method of construction using a framework of poles, and sometimes wire-netting, to support dagha walls, which are then plastered.
1936 P.M. Clark Autobiog. of Old Drifter 113They were all huts of the dagga and pole make of walls, with thatched roofs — a mode of construction giving huts that are cool to live in.
1967 E.M. Slatter My Leaves Are Green 58John Lodick’s partner was lying in the small pole-and-dagga hospital on the ridge.
1974 E. Prov. Herald 25 MayA house made out of flattened and rusted paraffin tins, beaten flat and laid..over pole-and-dagga walls.
Building mortar, used for laying bricks and for plastering walls and floors, previously made chiefly of mud or ant-hill soil and sometimes mixed with cow-dung and/or blood; now often a mixture of soil, sand, and lime. Also attributive.
In the phrr. dagha-and-pole, pole-and-dagha, usually attributive, descriptive of a method of construction using a framework of poles, and sometimes wire-netting, to support dagha walls, which are then plastered.

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18791992