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borrie, noun

Forms:
boorie, boriShow more Also boorie, bori, borie, borri.
Origin:
Dutch, MalayShow more Dutch, from Malay boreh turmeric.
1. Turmeric, the yellow spice derived from the powdered root of the plant Curcuma longa of the Zingiberaceae.
[1798 S.H. Wilcocke tr. of J.S. Stavorinus’s Voy. to E. Indies II. 136The emperors [in Java] sometimes make criminals condemned to death fight with tigers. In such cases, the man is rubbed with borri, or turmeric.]
1988 F. Williams Cape Malay Cookbk 8Borrie,..Ground spice obtained from the dried root of a plant related to ginger. It has a slightly bitter taste and care should be taken not to exceed the amount recommended in a recipe...Borrie is..used in curries, pickled fish and sosaties and for colouring yellow rice.
2. Used attributively of vegetables, fruit, and trees with reference to the yellow colour of the flesh or wood, as borriepatat /-paˌtat/, /pə-/ [Afrikaans, patat sweet potato] or borrie sweet potato, and borrie yellow (sometimes simply borrie), lemon wood.
1887 A.A. Anderson 25 Yrs in Waggon I. 42The Pongola Bush..is a beautiful forest of fine timber...Ebenhout, a sort of ebony; Borrie yellow, Bockenhout, no regular grain; Assagaai, used for spear handles; [etc.].
1986 Cape Times 6 Feb. (advt)Borrie Sweet Potatoes 39c per kg.
Turmeric, the yellow spice derived from the powdered root of the plant Curcuma longa of the Zingiberaceae.
Used attributively of vegetables, fruit, and trees with reference to the yellow colour of the flesh or wood, as borriepatat-paˌtatpə-, patat sweet potato or borrie sweet potato, and borrie yellow (sometimes simply borrie), lemon wood.

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17981988