borehole, noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Transferred use of general English borehole a hole drilled as an ancillary process in mining, oil drilling, etc.
A well drilled to tap underground water and furnished with a windmill, an engine, or occasionally a hand-pump to bring the water to the surface. Also attributive.
Note:
A common feature in gardens and on farms in dry areas.
1911 Farmer’s Weekly 15 Mar. 4The water supply comes from a 16ft. windmill over a borehole tested to yield at least 96,000 gallons of water per day, and this water is pumped into a cement reservoir.
1989 J. Hobbs Thoughts in Makeshift Mortuary 302Every few hundred metres, clustered like ticks round borehole windmills, were settlements of mud-brick houses and corrugated iron lean-tos.
A well drilled to tap underground water and furnished with a windmill, an engine, or occasionally a hand-pump to bring the water to the surface. Also attributive.

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19111989