baar, noun and & adjective

Plurals:
baaren, baren.
Origin:
Dutch, MalayShow more Dutch, probably adaptation of Malay baharu new, inexperienced.
A. noun obs. A novice, newcomer, or raw military recruit. See also bari, mompara.
1868 [see oorlam n. sense 1].
1913 C. Pettman (tr. of N. Mansvelt’s Idioticon) in Africanderisms 38Baar,..The word has come down from the days of the Dutch East India Company; the men who had seen considerable service were called Oorlammen (Mal. orang lami, old person), while the recruits were called Baren (Mal. orang baru, new hand). In India and also at the Military Academy at Breda the word seems to be used in the sense of green, inexperienced. In sailor language it also indicates a novice.
1919 M. Greenlees tr. of O.F. Mentzel’s Life at Cape in Mid-18th C. 80In the end, between thirty and forty men, most of them baaren, being driven to it by hunger and distress, made a plot together and planned to desert.
B. adjective Obs. exc. historical. Stupid; untaught. Cf. oorlam adjective sense 2.
1881 [see oorlam adj. sense 2].
1913 C. Pettman (tr. of N. Mansvelt’s Idioticon) in Africanderisms 38Baar,..The word is employed of both men and animals; in the former case it has the meaning of unskilful, untrained.
1980 [see oorlams sense 2].
A novice, newcomer, or raw military recruit.
Stupid; untaught.
Entry Navigation

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

19131919