vat, verb

/fat/
Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Afrikaans, take, get, seize.
1. intransitive. In urban, especially township, English: in the colloquial phrase to vat en sit [see vat en sit noun], to live as husband and wife in a common-law marriage.
[1926 P.W. Laidler Tavern of Ocean 95In the words of the modern person of colour, wives were somarso gevat, taken anyhow.]
1952 Drum Nov. 11Only 5% of some 65,000 families in a local emergency camp were actually married. The rest just ‘vat en sit,’ bilingual for ‘take and sit,’ to get a shelter or some other convenience, and then quit when they’ve had it.
1959 L. Longmore Dispossessed 32A girl who is foolish enough to agree to live with a man, as man and wife, known as vat en sit ‘just take and sit’, or ‘keep’, hoping that eventually he will decide to marry her, is entertaining false hopes.
1959 L. Longmore Dispossessed 69One informant remarked that any man who wants to be free from worries and to live long should never enter into a marriage contract with any woman, but instead he should just ‘keep’ a woman or vat en sit (as it is expressed in vulgar colloquialism).
2. transitive. In the phrase vat jou goed en trek [from the name of an Afrikaans folk song Vat jou goed en trek, Ferreira take your belongings and go, Ferreira], take your things and be gone; be off with you; good riddance.
Derivatives:
Hence to vat one’s goed and trek, to leave, to take one’s belongings and leave.
1974 Daily Dispatch 2 Dec. 10For those members who don’t contribute.., to those members who walk out before the end of the meetings and to those who don’t even attend meetings, all I can say is vat jou goed en trek.
1989 Sunday Times 30 Apr. 22Vat jou goed en Trek. The massive Mobil disinvestment must be a cause for serious thought among the departing American oil giant’s 2 800 employees in South Africa.
1989 J. Dowson in Argus 17 Nov. (Tonight) 11He’s looking as sparkling as an Omo-white shirt and grinning as sweetly as a koeksister. The stubble of yore has vat-ed its goed and trekked.
3. transitive. In the colloquial phrase vat hom /ˈfat (h)ɔm/ [Afrikaans, get him, get it (a command to a dog, but also an exhortation to a rugby-player, etc.)], ‘get him’, ‘go for it’: an expression of approval or encouragement, as shouted (often with a name following) to a participant in sport or to a person attempting something daunting; sometimes used ironically, often representing Afrikaans speech.
1980 Cape Times 16 May 3Years ago we had ‘Vat hom Dawie’ — and now we have ‘Hey Morné’, warning the current Springbok captain that the Boks had better donner the Lions.
1981 Fair Lady 25 Feb. 220 (advt)If Farmer Brown chickens were people, they’d all be Springboks (vat him Maudie) they’re so fit.
1990 Style Feb. 49Well, say I, whether the forces are heavenly or not, let them be with us. Vat hom, Flaffie!
1991 Weekly Mail 20 Dec. 19The only locally made condom, elegantly entitled ‘Crepe de Chine’ instead of ‘Voortrekker Mark 1’ or ‘Vat hom, Fluffie’ is an option if you’re into penetrating that market.
, to live as husband and wife in a common-law marriage.
take your things and be gone; be off with you; good riddance.
‘get him’, ‘go for it’: an expression of approval or encouragement, as shouted (often with a name following) to a participant in sport or to a person attempting something daunting; sometimes used ironically, often representing Afrikaans speech.
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19261991

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