target, noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special sense of general English.
slang
Especially among township activists: something (or someone) considered to be a symbol of apartheid, and against which (or whom) violence or other criminal acts are consequently thought justifiable; especially, any motor vehicle thought to belong to a white-owned company.
1986 F. Khashane in Pace May 16Take..the hijacking of cars. It started..with youths forcing motorists to transport them to funerals, but..developed into a..crime racket when the thugs took over. They branded any car believed to belong to a white company a ‘target’. After two Pace cars were hijacked as ‘targets’, one was burnt and the other was recovered damaged.
1986 F. Chikane in Burman & Reynolds Growing Up 343Siyayinyova..is the popular slogan used by the youths when attacking what they call ‘targets’, meaning the buildings, vehicles, and individuals regarded as symbols of the apartheid regime and its forces.
1988 N. Mathiane in Frontline Apr.May 12At the height of ‘comrade mania’, my sister was stopped by youths for driving a ‘target’ meaning a car belonging to a white company. It was forcefully taken away from her.
1988 S. Mbokane in Fair Lady 20 July 79Not all white people are targets (township slang for whites who are targetted for attack) because every person is unique.
something (or someone) considered to be a symbol of apartheid, and against which (or whom) violence or other criminal acts are consequently thought justifiable; especially, any motor vehicle thought to belong to a white-owned company.
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19861988