salempore, noun

Forms:
Also salampore, salemporis.
Origin:
English, 17th century Dutch, 18th century FrenchShow more In general English from the late 16th century, but perhaps now obsolete; perhaps from Salampur, a city in the Nellore district of India. (Cf. 17th century Dutch salamporij, 18th century French salempouri.)
obsolescent
1. A blue (often striped) cotton cloth, originally made at Nellore in India, and commonly worn in the past by African people. Also attributive.
Note:
The cloth was originally exported to the West Indies for use by slaves.
1863 W.C. Baldwin Afr. Hunting 21Paid them on arrival with brass wire and blue salempore, or calico.
1883 B. Mitford Through Zulu Country 189On shelves against the walls are arranged blankets, Salampore, cloth [etc.].
1921 H.J. Mandelbrote tr. of O.F. Mentzel’s Descr. of Cape of G.H. I. 143He sells wholesale, by the piece, East Indian cotton goods such as chintz, calico, ‘salemporis’,..as well as quilts and counterpanes lined with cotton wool and cotton yarns.
1949 O. Walker Proud Zulu (1951) 71When Catherine heard of the new birth she got out a roll of salempore (native blanket cloth), thinking to send it down.
1961 T.V. Bulpin White Whirlwind 53They took up blankets, Salampore cloth, brass wire, and other items which they traded for the fancy skins the Zulus use in their military costumes.
2. A garment made from salempore.
1948 O. Walker Kaffirs Are Lively 79She was dressed only in a salempore — a striped cotton blanket tucked under the arms, which is almost universal among the Bavenda women.
A blue (often striped) cotton cloth, originally made at Nellore in India, and commonly worn in the past by African people. Also attributive.
A garment made from salempore.

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