recuse, verb

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special sense of general English recuse to reject, renounce (a person, his authority etc.); to object to as prejudiced.
Used reflexively:
1. Law. a. To disqualify oneself from office because of a conflict of interest. b. Of a court: to declare a conflict of interest (and thus an inability to reach a verdict).
Note:
Also a legal term in U.S. English.
1960 J.J.L. Sisson S. Afr. Judicial Dict. 669Recusation, Once a court has recused itself it becomes functus officio, and cannot then record any verdict.
1968 G.I. Raftesath Suppl. to Sisson’s S. Afr. Judicial Dict. 116A magistrate who in his administrative capacity has become aware of all the facts which gave rise to a prosecution, and possibly gave instructions for, or at least approved of, the institution of the prosecution, cannot sit to hear the case, and should recuse himself.
2. transferred sense. To absent oneself from a (committee) meeting for a period, because of a conflict of interest.
1994 M-Net TV 19 June (Carte Blanche)The obligation to recuse oneself rests with the chairman.
1994 M-Net TV 19 June (Carte Blanche)Failing to recuse himself from council when his family interests were involved.
1994 M-Net TV 19 June (Carte Blanche)I had sat in on a meeting 4 years ago when I should have recused myself.
To disqualify oneself from office because of a conflict of interest.
Of a court: to declare a conflict of interest (and thus an inability to reach a verdict).
To absent oneself from a (committee) meeting for a period, because of a conflict of interest.
Derivatives:
Hence recusation noun, the act of recusing oneself of or being recused.
1943 in J.J.L. Sisson S. Afr. Judicial Dict. (1960) 669The object of recusation in the Roman-Dutch law was a declinatory exception known to the Roman Law as the exceptio judicis suspectii.
1960 [see sense 1].
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19431994

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