parallel, adjective

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special senses of general English parallel side by side.
1. In historical contexts. Of political practices and concepts: based on a policy of racial segregation; usually in (or referring to) official government terminology, in the phrase parallel development. See also separate development.
[1950 Annual Register 1949 140The conflict between the Southern Rhodesian policy of ‘parallel development’ with its emphasis on permanent European control, and the United Kingdom policy of partnership leading to self-government.]
1971 Weekend World 9 May 3Chief George agreed with an Opposition claim that parallel development in the Republic meant that the Europeans were in the sky and Africans were in the mud.
1973 Cape Times 21 June 11They felt the political development of the Coloured people should be rapidly accelarated but within the ‘parallel’ concept of a fully-representative Coloured Representative Council (CRC) with greater executive powers...He suggested a middle course embracing rapid parallel development of the Coloured townships as ‘equal towns and cities’.
2. In the phrase parallel-medium, of or pertaining to schooling or a school in which two languages of instruction (usually English and Afrikaans) are used, in separate classes. Cf. dual-medium.
1958 Cape Argus 10 Dec. 20The classroom instruction given in Afrikaans-medium classes in a parallel-medium school would be as Afrikaans as instruction given in the classes of an exclusively single medium Afrikaans school.
1971 Sunday Times 28 Mar. (Business Times) 4 (advt)Separate English and Afrikaans medium primary schooling, and parallel-medium schooling to matriculation standard is available.
1977 Sunday Times 2 Oct. 16This Parallel-Medium School — Unique in South Africa — Offers Five Fields of Study.
1991 [see dual-medium].
based on a policy of racial segregation; usually in (or referring to) official government terminology, in the phrase parallel development.
of or pertaining to schooling or a school in which two languages of instruction (usually English and Afrikaans) are used, in separate classes.
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