pap, adjective

/pap/
Origin:
Afrikaans
colloquial
a. Weak, lacking substance; (of food) soft, tasteless.
1912 H.H. Juta Reminisc. 77Judge: ‘I can read and write and “reken”, but I don’t want to be a schoolmaster, thank you.’ Farmer: ‘No, of course not...But it doesn’t matter: your Dutch is too “pap”.’
1991 N.P. Saunders Informant, ScottburghPap — soft or withered or just tired out. ‘Don’t buy those bananas they are pap.’
b. Of persons: physically exhausted, feeble; unassertive, weak; soft, flabby. See also papbroek.
1934 C.P. Swart Supplement to Pettman. 133Pap,..In its adjectival sense ‘soft’, it is steadily gaining ground among English-speaking South Africans and one frequently hears such expressions as: the tennis balls are ‘pap’; the tyres are ‘pap’; I’m feeling ‘pap’ (exhausted).
1991 H.C. Watts Informant, Cape TownIn this heat I feel so pap — no energy at all.
c. Of tyres, balls, and other inflated objects: flat, under-inflated.
1934 [see sense b].
1991 G. Murray Informant, AlbertonMy wheel was pap so I had to push the bike home.
Weak, lacking substance; (of food) soft, tasteless.
physically exhausted, feeble; unassertive, weak; soft, flabby.
flat, under-inflated.

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19121991