oumissus, noun

Forms:
oumiesies, ou miesusShow more Also oumiesies, ou miesus, oumissis, and with initial capital(s).
Origin:
AfrikaansShow more (Englished form of) Afrikaans oumiesies, ou old + miesies, see miesies.
The elderly female owner of a home, farm, or business, the employer of the servants and labourers who work there; an elderly white woman. In all senses also called ounooi (see nooi sense 1 c). Cf. oubaas.
a. A respectful form of address or reference.
1940 E. Bright in Baumann & Bright Lost Republic 221You, see, ou Missus, it was this way. When I was in the wrong, the ou baas said: ‘Simon, you have done so-and-so wrong’ and I saw his point.
1953 D. Rooke S. Afr. Twins 61‘The child is very clever,’ conceded Ouma. ‘Yes Oumissis,’ said Aia Kobie, looking fondly at Sophie.
1978 D.A.C. Maclennan in Contrast 45 Vol.12 No.1, 54The shepherd came to the kitchen door...‘Baas,’ he said, ‘Ou missies doesn’t answer.’
b. A common noun; oumies, see mies sense c.
1970 M. Weitzman Informant, JohannesburgThe old madame. How is the oumissus?
1974 D. Rooke Margaretha de la Porte 122‘Do as he says. I will look after your nonnie.’ ‘I would like to go but it had better be the oumissis who tells me, not you.’
1977 N. Okes in Quarry ’77 131Dr. Hopkins had come in then, followed by the Oumissus.
1979 M. Parkes Wheatlands 41An African maid, ‘Sophie’,..unfortunately suffered from a cleft palate and was almost unintelligible, but she and the ‘ou Miesus’ understood each other.
1982 Sunday Times 21 Mar. 3Mr Felix said: ‘Bekke recognised us immediately and came charging up. The “ou missus” started crying and hugged the dog. My heart also melted when I saw how happy the mistress was to get the dog back again.’
c. A title, sometimes with a proper name.
1974 D. Rooke Margaretha de la Porte 225Oumissis has a muzzleloader too from the days of long ago.
1993 S. Dikeni in House & Leisure Nov. 42He asked someone to give me a sweet right under the disapproving scrutiny of Oumiesies Grobbelaar.
The elderly female owner of a home, farm, or business, the employer of the servants and labourers who work there; an elderly white woman.
A respectful form of address or reference.
A common noun; oumies, see miesc.
A title, sometimes with a proper name.
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