DSAE test file

laager, noun

Forms:
lager, laargerShow more Also lager, and (formerly) laarger, largaar, larger, lawger, leger.
Origin:
South African Dutch, DutchShow more South African Dutch laager, lager (cf. Afrikaans laer), from Dutch lager, leger camp.
I. historical Nineteenth century senses.
1.
a. A defensive encampment surrounded and fortified by wagons lashed or chained together, particularly an encampment of emigrant Boers (see Voortrekker noun sense 1); the fortifying ring of wagons; occasionally with qualifying word, wagon laager. Also attributive, and combination laager-camp (rare).
1834 T.H. Bowker Journal. 29 Dec.About dusk the Kafirs commence taking the Cattle down from the lawger-Camp — which they endeavour to storm by violently driving herds of Cattle down the hill upon the waggons.
1991 G. Zwirn in Settler Vol.65 No.2, 11A laager was an encampment formed by ox-wagons lashed together and drawn end to end, thus making a circle or square for the protection of the people and animals inside.
b. Collectively, the occupants of a fortified encampment.
1851 T. Shone Diary. 17 Jan.I went to Bathurst..about the rations, Mr Currie declares he will give none, untill the whole Larger as enrolled their names.
1942 S. Cloete Hill of Doves 19He..had survived the massacre of Uys’s laager by the Zulus.
c. In the adv. phrr. in laager, into laager: in, or into, a defensive and fortified state.
1879 Mrs Hutchinson In Tents in Tvl 48In the event of an attack, the inhabitants would have to ‘go into laager’ as they call it.
1977 S. Afr. Panorama Nov. 19Bowker designed the town with a hexagonal space in the centre..where the inhabitants could go into laager to defend themselves.
d. A convoy of wagons, of a number large enough to form a defensive encampment if necessary.
1900 W.S. Churchill London to Ladysmith 452The great white tilted waggons of the various laagers filed along the road.
1933 W.H.S. Bell Bygone Days 118Women and children had preferred..to accompany the commandos and..lived in nomadic laagers.
e. Special Combinations and phrases
cattle laager, an encampment used for the safeguarding of cattle in time of war;
||vroue laager /ˈfrəʊə-/ [Afrikaans vroue women] or women’s laager, an encampment in which women and other non-combatants live during times of war.
1901 P.J. Du Toit Diary (1974) 37An unexpected attack was made on the women’s laager, about 37 waggons with families captured, besides large flocks of cattle and some prisoners.
1982 Sunday Times 16 May 22The commando had two laagers — the ‘vroue laager’ consisting of women, children and those too old or infirm to fight, and the ‘perde commando’, the fighting laager.
2. transferred sense. Any fortified place, either of a permanent nature (in which residents of a district customarily gather for safety in time of war) or of a temporary nature (in which groups of people shelter on a short-term basis).
[1846 Natal Witness 11 Dec. 1These people were compelled, for several years, to remain concentrated in encampments, or ‘legers’.]
1973 E. Prov. Herald 9 Feb.The farmhouse had formed a valuable laager and refuge for other neighbouring members of the Bowker family during these Kaffir Wars, as it was best suited for protection purposes.
II. Modern figurative senses.
3. Any more or less circular arrangement of objects or persons, especially one intended to form a barrier; the area enclosed by this. Also attributive.
1910 J. Buchan Prester John 94My laager of barrels was intact.
1993 Motorist 1st Quarter 15Bush was cleared, vehicles parked to form a laager, a generator was kicked into action.
4. Usually in a political context, and often attributive.
a. Allusively, isolationist thinking or intransigence in groupings, attitudes, or policies, particularly as found among right-wing Afrikaners, and in the South African polity during the era of apartheid. Cf. boma noun1 sense 4.
1939 [see jabroer].
1993 M. Shaik in Weekly Mail & Guardian 29 Oct. 2Bashing the police force pushes the hardliners into the laager, while the good people leave the force.
b. In the phr. laager mentality, an attitude of isolationism and intransigence born of fear or anger.
1958 Times Lit. Suppl. (U.K.) 14 Feb. 87That the leaders of the Nationalist Party have created a ‘laager’ mentality and hate all opponents of apartheid is a fact.
1993 B. Mahabir in Sunday Times 10 Oct. 18One can safely conclude that most Afrikaners will not go along with the laager mentality of the right wing.
5. A group of volkspele dancers.
1974 S. Afr. Panorama Nov. 19The National Council for Folk Singing and Dancing chose 36 ‘volkspelers’ (folk dancers) from different ‘laers’ (laagers) to accompany the overseas dancers and perform with them.
A defensive encampment surrounded and fortified by wagons lashed or chained together, particularly an encampment of emigrant Boers (see Voortrekkernoun1); the fortifying ring of wagons; occasionally with qualifying word, wagon laager.
Collectively, the occupants of a fortified encampment.
In the adv. phrr. in laager, into laager: in, or into, a defensive and fortified state.
A convoy of wagons, of a number large enough to form a defensive encampment if necessary.
Any fortified place, either of a permanent nature (in which residents of a district customarily gather for safety in time of war) or of a temporary nature (in which groups of people shelter on a short-term basis).
Any more or less circular arrangement of objects or persons, especially one intended to form a barrier; the area enclosed by this. Also attributive.
Allusively, isolationist thinking or intransigence in groupings, attitudes, or policies, particularly as found among right-wing Afrikaners, and in the South African polity during the era of apartheid.
an attitude of isolationism and intransigence born of fear or anger.
A group of volkspele dancers.
Derivatives:
Hence (all modern nonce uses) laagerism noun, the manifestation of an insular or intransigent attitude; laageritis noun, a ‘disease’ characterized by insularity or intransigence; laagerize transitive verb, to cause (a person, persons, or organization) to become insular and intransigent; so laagerizing verbal noun.
1975 Sunday Times 20 Apr. 16Unlike RAU and Stellenbosch — which, by opening the academic doors..to Black post-graduate students, have traded in the symbolic wa (sc. wagon)..— Tuks continues to suffer from an advanced case of laageritis.
1989 Style Dec. 151Botha..underwent all the regular conditioning and was exposed to all the laagerisms of any Vrystaat Afrikaner boy.

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