karinkeltjie, noun

Forms:
Also karinkelkie.
Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Afrikaans; see quotation 1985.
Music
The extension of the last note of a musical phrase by a precentor, used to assist the singers he leads in achieving the correct intonation; a song in which this technique is used.
1981 S. Afr. Digest 30 Oct. 12The only Eastern element is found in the contribution of the cantors, or precentors, who lead the song in ‘karinkeltjies’ (glosses), to be followed by the choir on the European scale.
[1985 A. Davids in Papers, Symposium on Ethnomusicology, 1984 (I.L.A.M.) 37The Arabic influence of Cape Malay Music is evident from the Karinka, i.e. the dragging out of the end notes of a line or verse of a song in fluctuating intonation..a very distinctive characteristic in the rendering of the Athaan, the Islamic call for prayer, to create musical effect.]
1989 C. Chapman in Edgars Club Apr. 45The roots of Cape music, according to Kramer can be traced to various influences. Firstly, European folk songs, or Nederlands liedjies, preserved by the Malay choirs, sung in Dutch and still sung today. Secondly, the Eastern influenced karinkelkies, brought in by the slaves from Malaysia.
1989 Personality 26 June 77Cape Town..is where teeming sprawling District Six gave rise to a new kind of South African culture and music. It had its roots in the beating of the goema drum on the slave ships sailing to Table Bay, the Nederlandse liedjies, the unique body movements of Hottentots and Bushmen, Coon Carnivals, karinkelkies and travelling minstrels.
The extension of the last note of a musical phrase by a precentor, used to assist the singers he leads in achieving the correct intonation; a song in which this technique is used.
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19811989