kanna, noun2

Forms:
canna, channaShow more Also canna, channa, gonna, konna.
Origin:
Khoikhoi
1. Either of two species of succulents, Sceletium anatomicum or S. tortuosum of the Mesembryanthemaceae, the roots and stems of which were formerly chewed by various peoples, especially the Khoikhoi, for their narcotic effect. Also attributive.
1611 P. Floris in R. Raven-Hart Before Van Riebeeck (1967) 55Wee vsed great diligence in seeking of the roote Ningimm..being called of these inhabitants Canna.
1688 G. Tachard Voy. to Siam 73The captain..sent us..a certain herb which they call Konna [sic]; it is probable that that famous Plant which the Chinese name Ginsseng; for Monsieur Claudius who hath seen it at China, affirms that he found two Plants of it upon the Cape...They use Kanna as frequently as the Indians do Betle and Areka.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. I. 212I have often seen the Effects of Kanna upon Hottentots. They chew and retain it a considerable Time in their Mouths.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. I. 262The Kanna Root..is in such Esteem among ’em, that they hardly think any Thing too good to be given in Exchange for it.
1796 C.R. Hopson tr. of C.P. Thunberg’s Trav. II. 175These people first chew Canna (Mesembryanthemum,) and afterwards smoke it.
1838 J.E. Alexander Exped. into Int. I. 100We ate the thick and reddish root called canna.
1913 C. Pettman Africanderisms 248Kanna,..a Karoo plant = Mesembryanthemum anatomicum.
1966 C.A. Smith Common Names 276The properties ascribed to Kanna are decidedly those of some species of Sceletium of which Thunberg..first recorded the vernacular name...Thunberg..and Sparrmann..had..described Salsola aphylla under the vernacular name of Kanna...This..confusion..seems to have arisen from the rendering of the original Nederlands spelling Channa (for Salsola aphylla) as Kanna.
1972 M.R. Levyns in Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. V. 287‘Gonna’ has..been taken as the equivalent of ‘kanna’, which should rightfully be confined to species of Sceletium, a genus allied to Mesembyanthemum and much prized by the Hottentots for its stimulant action.
2. combination
Kannaland, see quotation 1989.
Note:
Some believe this name to be derived from kanna noun3, or from ganna: see quotations 1844, 1913, and 1967.
1790 W. Paterson Narr. of Four Journeys 23This is called, the Channa Land; and derives its name from a species of Mezembryanthimum, which is called Channa by the natives, and is exceedingly esteemed among them.
1844 J. Backhouse Narr. of Visit 112This country is called the Little Karroo or Kanneland; from its producing a bush abounding with soda called Kannabosch, Caroxylon Salsola.
1880 S.W. Silver & Co.’s Handbk to S. Afr. 526Kannaland or Little Karroo is an elevated plain between the Langeberg and Zwartberg range of mountains.
1913 C. Pettman Africanderisms 249Kannaland, The part of the colony lying between the little Zwaart Berg Range and Touws River, probably so called as being the habitat formerly of the kanna or eland.
1966 C.A. Smith Common Names 276Paterson about 1779 also records that Channaland was so named from the abundance of a plant, one of the Mesembryeae [sic] (Sceletium) growing there.
1967 E. Rosenthal Encycl. of Sn Afr. 280Kannaland, Portion of the Cape Province between Touws River and the Swartberg. The name is derived from the fact that it used to be inhabited by many Eland (Kanna in Hottentot language).
1989 P.E. Raper Dict. of Sn Afr. Place Names 86Cannaland, Region extending from Ezeljachtpoort to Platte Kloof, situated north of the Outeniqua Mountains. The name is derived from Khoekhoen and refers to the canna root, an edible type of Mesembryanthemum. Also encountered as Kannaland and Canaan’s Land.
Either of two species of succulents, Sceletium anatomicum or S. tortuosum of the Mesembryanthemaceae, the roots and stems of which were formerly chewed by various peoples, especially the Khoikhoi, for their narcotic effect. Also attributive.
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16111989

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