DSAE test file

doek, noun

/dʊk/, /duk/
Forms:
Also dook, douk.
Origin:
South African Dutch, DutchShow more South African Dutch, from Dutch doek cloth.
1. obsolete. A cloth or handkerchief.
1798 Lady A. Barnard Lett. to Henry Dundas (1973) 145I offered her four schellings or a dook, viz. a handkerchief; she preferred the last.
1947 H. Kuper in Vandag Vol.1 No.8, 2The tears stopped, and from her canvas bag she took a large new yellow doek with which she blew her nose.
2. A headscarf or kerchief, tied about the head in any of several ways; doekie; kopdoek.
1852 H. Ward Jasper Lyle 12To the family party were now added three or four Hottentot servant-girls, their woolly locks concealed beneath bright-coloured douks (head-kerchiefs).
1992 S. Gutknecht in Sunday Times 19 Apr. (Mag. Sect.) 28That scarf-thing women wear over the heads, the doek.
3. combinations
doek-pudding, ||doek-poeding /-ˌpudəŋ/ [Afrikaans, poeding pudding], a steamed pudding, boiled in a cloth.
1964 L.G. Green Old Men Say 133They carry the old Cape cuisine in their heads, from frikkadel and sosaties to geelrys and doekpudding.
1978 M. Van Biljon Sunday Times 24 Dec. in J. Branford Dict. of S. Afr. Eng. (1980) 67Our cook Ai Nettie Pekeur’s stupendous ‘doekpoeding’ made with grated carrots.
A cloth or handkerchief.
A headscarf or kerchief, tied about the head in any of several ways; doekie; kopdoek.
, a steamed pudding, boiled in a cloth.

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17981992