clacking, verbal noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special sense of general English clacking ‘the making of a sharp, hard noise; chatter of tongues’ (OED).
obs.
The action of producing a speech sound known as a click; clapping; clocking, see clock.
1601 J. Lancaster in R. Raven-Hart Before Van Riebeeck (1967) 24Their language is very hard to be pronounced, by reason of a kinde of clacking with the tongue; so that we could not learne one worde of their language.
1795 C.R. Hopson tr. of C.P. Thunberg’s Trav. II. 72The Hottentot language is not every where the same, but has very different dialects; all of them, however, are pronounced with a kind of smack, or clacking of the organs of speech...These clackings are the more difficult to perform, as they must be made at the very instant of uttering the word, and not before nor after.
[1841 B. Shaw Memorials 19Almost all their monosyllables, and the leading syllables in compound words are thrown out of the mouth with a sudden retraction of the tongue from the teeth or palate, and sound not unlike the clacking of a hen with her chickens.]
The action of producing a speech sound known as a click; clapping; clocking, see clock.

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