Capey, noun

Forms:
Caapie, CapieShow more Also Caapie, Capie, Cape-jie.
Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Probably formed on Afrikaans Kaapie, Kaap Cape + -ie.
colloquial
1.
a. Cape Coloured noun phrase. Also attributive.
1940 V. Pohl Bushveld Adventures 188Our oarsman, a ‘Capie’ named Willem, a short but extremely powerfully built fellow, placed a shot-gun in the boat as we were about to depart.
1949 O. Walker Wanton City 171‘E’s a bad ole bastard, eh?’ said the driver. ‘Always muckin’ around with the Capies.’
1959 J. Meiring Candle in Wind 139‘He must be white. What is he doing with a Capie?’ said the first girl, crossly.
1963 A. Fugard Blood Knot (1968) 131Just a little bit black, And a little bit white, He’s a Capie through and through.
1965 K. Thompson Richard’s Way 45The little miss is married — did you know? and lives at Tokai over the-e-e-re. The long drawn Capey vowel indicated great, very great distance.
1974 D. Rooke Margaretha de la Porte 48She learned new songs from the Capies at their fires: ‘Polly we are going to Paarl’ and ‘Here comes the Alabama’.
1990 R. Gool Cape Town Coolie 59I ’eard it you living in the Cape now...You looking like a Cape-jie already.
b. In full Capeytaal /-tɑːl/ [Afrikaans taal language]: the argot spoken by some ‘coloured’ people, consisting of a mixture of languages, especially Afrikaans, English, and Xhosa; gammat-taal (often derogatory and offensive), see gammat sense 2.
1979 C. Van der Merwe in Frontline Dec. 17Flytaal..embraces Capeytaal and a large chunk of fanakalo.
1981 V.A. February Mind your Colour 95Kaaps..is not what some Englishman in South Africa refers to as ‘Capey’,..not what some Afrikaans-speaking persons refer to as Gamat-taal.
2. An inhabitant of the Western Cape, or of the city of Cape Town. Cf. Kaapenaar sense 1. See also Capetonian.
1970 Drum Nov. 15If there ever has to be a roll call of Capeys in Durban it’ll have to be on a scroll to contain all the names.
1974 A.P. Brink Looking on Darkness 226‘You know mos the old story, hey, Capey?’..And it was with conscious irony that he called me ‘Capey’, for he was as much a Capetonian as myself, and much darker too.
1979 Capetonian July 4Having just read why Capeys are different from Transvalers, I guffawed so loudly it was heard by everybody in this building.
1981 C. Barnard in Daily Dispatch 16 Nov. 8In the good old days of the Cape, which most middle-aged Capies can remember clearly, the local fishermen would travel around town on a cart announcing themselves with a blast on a long tube of dried seaweed.
1989 S. Hobbs in Style Dec. 6You Caapies seem to think yours is the only town with some sort of scenic beauty.
[1994 T. Cobbleigh in Sunday Times 2 Jan. 19Johannesburg!..the city so scorned by Kaapies and Banana-boys.]
Cape Colourednoun phrase. Also attributive.
the argot spoken by some ‘coloured’ people, consisting of a mixture of languages, especially Afrikaans, English, and Xhosa; gammat-taal (often derogatory and offensive), see gammat2.
An inhabitant of the Western Cape, or of the city of Cape Town.
Entry Navigation

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

19401994