boetie, noun

Forms:
boeti, bootieShow more Also boeti, bootie, buttie, and with initial capital.
Origin:
AfrikaansShow more Afrikaans, ‘little brother’ (see boet + -ie).
colloquial
1. A brother.
a. Used as a term of reference, usually for a brother who is still a teenager and living at home. Cf. boet sense 3 a.
1867 E.L. Price Jrnls (1956) 253’Tis the ruling principle of every action, I think — love for the ‘vrow & kinderen’ — ‘the man & the kinderen’ — ‘the buttie & Sisi’.
1986 M. Picardie in S. Gray Market Plays 94I was the youngest, you see. My boeties and sussies were all at school.
b. An affectionate form of address.
1913 C. Pettman Africanderisms 74Boeti, A pet name often given to the eldest or favourite son.
1988 J. Ferguson in New Nation 14 Jan. 10Boetie’s on the Border Still fighting for the country.
2. ‘Brother’: a familiar form of address to any man or boy. Cf. bhuti sense a, boet sense 1 a.
1903 E. Glanville Diamond Seekers 270There’s a lot of things you don’t know, bootie.
1988 K. De Boer in Frontline Apr. 26Boeties, unless somebody else starts formulating really challenging alternative ideals and dreams, we’re in for a nasty bit of volksontwaking in the near future.
3. derogatory. boetie-boetie: partisan behaviour. Also as adjective, in cahoots, over-friendly.
1956 D. Jacobson Dance in Sun 73Frank found that he and the other were boetie-boetie again, confidential.
1971 Daily Dispatch 2 Oct. 12Most people voted according to tribal lines. It was a question of ‘boetie-boetie’. Voters were not influenced by what the candidates said in their meetings.
4. obsolescent. Offensive to many. In the Eastern Cape: a term used for a black male employee. Cf. sisi sense 1 b.
1973 Headmistress’s letter, GrahamstownWarning: Only ‘Boeties’ in [school] overalls should be allowed to carry luggage into the Houses at the beginning of term.
5. figurative. A political fellow-traveller. See also kaffirboetie.
1973 Y. Burgess Life to Live 120The men in the bar..agreed that the country was going to the dogs, that the Commies, the kaffirs, and the ‘boeties’, that is, brothers, of both, had taken over.
1987 R. Du Preez in Sunday Times 12 Apr. 1Singer Mara Louw was telephoned and threatened with death by a woman who accused her of being an ‘ANC boetie’.
6. figurative. A generic nickname given to an Afrikaner, or to an aggressively masculine male. Also used ironically.
1973 F. Chisholm in Cape Times 30 June 7The driver was a typical gun-happy South African with his Lee Enfield in a rack behind the seat, continually clapping on brakes, anxious to blaze away at every living thing he saw. This distressed the Prince until he was finally able to quell boetie’s destructive ardour.
1992 H. Tyrrell in Weekly Mail 24 Apr. 24Change in this country has not come about from waiting until big boetie and his business cronies are ready to throw out some crumbs.
A brother.
Used as a term of reference, usually for a brother who is still a teenager and living at home. Cf. boet3 a.
An affectionate form of address.
‘Brother’: a familiar form of address to any man or boy.
partisan behaviour. Also as adjective, in cahoots, over-friendly.
a term used for a black male employee.
A political fellow-traveller.
A generic nickname given to an Afrikaner, or to an aggressively masculine male. Also used ironically.

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