apron, noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special senses of general English.
obs.
1. An article of traditional African dress consisting of a flap or thongs of softened hide suspended from the hips at the front or back. Cf. kaross sense 2, mutsha.
1691 Browne in R. Raven-Hart Cape G.H. 1652–1702 (1971) II. 388The men have litle bit of skin which hangs befor their privie members, and the women a kind of apron.
1786 G. Forster tr. of A. Sparrman’s Voy. to Cape of G.H. II. 283She was clad in the usual manner with a sheep-skin pellisse, and a well greased raw leathern apron..and could boast of as broad and flat a nose as any Hottentot lady whatever.
1824 W.J. Burchell Trav. II. 563They wear same dress as the Hottentots; but call the ‘fore-apron,’ by the names of makkaabi or moteeno (motayno), and the ‘hinder apron,’ by that of museesi (moosaysy).
1827 G. Thompson Trav. 417They (sc. Zulus) wear an apron of hide about the middle; and it becomes so pliable and soft, from frequent rubbing, that it has quite the appearance of cloth.
1835 A. Smith Diary (1940) II. 285The common jackal apron, a cap of skin with bead ornaments and a tail covered with beads fixed to the top.
1841 B. Shaw Memorials 21The females wear a little apron, ten or twelve inches in length, and as many in breadth, to which are appended six or eight chains of copper or iron.
1898 Chambers’s Jrnl (U.K.) 8 Jan. 95His only dress consisted of a monkey skin muchi, or apron, and in his hand he carried a rifle.
2. Hottentot apron, see Hottentot noun sense 6 b.
1905 G.W. Stow Native Races of S. Afr. 31These people..appear to have adopted among themselves the name of ‘Khai’, which is also the same as that given to the natural apron for which the women of pure Bushman and Hottentot races be distinguished.
An article of traditional African dress consisting of a flap or thongs of softened hide suspended from the hips at the front or back.
Hottentot apron, see Hottentotnoun6 b.
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