yard, noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special sense of general English.
Note:
Perhaps related to Jamaican English: ‘the Government yard’ in Trenchtown, a poor part of Kingston, Jamaica, is a collection of government-owned buildings within a walled area, with small flats rented out as accommodation.
A plot of land, or the grounds or courtyard of a building, accommodating a number of small, usually insubstantial rooms which are rented out as living space. Also attributive.
1915 Transvaal Leader in D.B. Coplan, Urbanization of African Performing Arts. (1980) 137There are yards..from which lead a labyrinth of passages, the haunt of the criminal, the passless native, the loafer.
1936 Williams & May I Am Black 103He took Shabala down foul-smelling passages and into yards where women lived in rickety tin shacks and plied their trades.
1936 Williams & May I Am Black 172Evangi..was selling beer again. He..found her in a yard not far from the middle of the city.
1948 E. Hellmann Rooiyard 7Rooiyard consists of 107 rooms and a shop, which serves as a kind of concession store to the yard. The yard is roughly triangular in shape.
1948 E. Hellmann Rooiyard 20The increasing difficulty of obtaining ‘yard’ accommodation is revealed by the fact that..only 5 out of 109 found it possible to obtain accommodation in yards.
1982 J. Manganye in Pace Nov. 180I found them burying their dead in the yard. I don’t like it because..his ghost may find it easy to give you problems because his grave is in the yard.
1987 P. Laurence in Star 24 Oct. 2Unlike other townships, the lowest structure is the yard committee.
1992 D. Nina in Focus on Afr. Apr.June 32Mama Irene’s grandchildren..like to play with matches — threatening the security of the yard.
A plot of land, or the grounds or courtyard of a building, accommodating a number of small, usually insubstantial rooms which are rented out as living space. Also attributive.

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19151992