wolf, noun2

Forms:
Also woolf.
Origin:
South African DutchShow more South African Dutch wolf hyaena (combining form wolwe-).
Used attributively in combinations:
wolf gif /-xəf/ (and formerly wolfgift), also wolwegif /ˈvɔlvəˌxəf/ [South African Dutch, gif, gift poison], poison used to kill hyaenas and jackals; a plant from which such poison is made;
wolf hok /-hɔk/ [Afrikaans, hok pen], wolf huis /-hœɪs/, also wolvehuis /ˈvɔlvəhœɪs/ [Dutch, huis house], a small building used as a trap for hyaenas and jackals; occasionally in dimunitive form wolfhuisie /-hœɪs(i)/ [see -ie].
1790 W. Paterson Narr. of Four Journeys 171A small shrubby plant, producing a nut, called by the Dutch, Woolf Gift, or Wolf Poison, which they use for poisoning Hyenas.
1993 S. Dikeni in House & Leisure Nov. 43Meat fell out of the sky and those who ate it..were rescued from death with milk, and were made to throw up meat poisoned with wolwegif.
1985 B. Johnson-Barker in Wynboer Feb. 63That little stone building..was actually a wolf-hok that his pa had built for trapping jakkalse and things many years ago.
1904 W.S.J. Sellick Uitenhage Past & Present p.ivAt fixed intervals..can still be seen little buildings, in the shape of a domestic oven, and..they were wolf-huizen (wolf-houses) built by the old trekkers.
1912 E. London Dispatch 29 July 6They..built a wolvehuis to trap hyenas.
1957 L.G. Green Beyond City Lights 165The old wolfhuisie, baited with a live sheep, last caught a hyena in 1819, but it still remains on the farm as a museum-piece.