vlek, verb transitive

/flek/, /flɛk/
Forms:
Also vleck.
Origin:
Afrikaans, DutchShow more Afrikaans, from Dutch vlekken to cleave, split open.
To gut, clean, or open out (a fish or a carcase); to cut (meat) into strips; fleck.
1838 J.E. Alexander Exped. into Int. II. 6Many of the people were employed during the remainder of the 30th of March in vleking or cutting the meat of the game we had killed into thin flaps or steaks, and hanging it on the bushes to dry.
1838 J.E. Alexander Exped. into Int. II. 127All night a party remained by it to cut and ‘vlek’ the meat, for carrying off a quantity of it; and the young rhinoceros alarmed them by coming close to them in the night to look for its mother.
[1976 Sunday Times 2 May 6Next day there’s a strong smell of fish frying and in the window a great gevlekte snoek.]
1983 Sunday Times 6 Mar. (Mag. Sect.) 16The snoek, vlecked, which is the fishmonger’s job, is placed in a baking pan, dotted with butter.
1986 C. Kirstein Best S. Afr. Braai Recipes 11Some fish, particularly snoek, yellowtail, haarders and galjoen, can be ‘vlekked’ (cut open so that the flesh, still attached to the back bone, opens out flat).
1989 I. Paarman in Femina Feb. 99Medium-large prawns, vlekked open, deveined and lightly salted with sea salt.
1991 E. Prov. Herald 15 Nov. 21We either use them (sc. ‘gorries’) whole or ‘vlek’ them open and remove the backbone.
To gut, clean, or open out (a fish or a carcase); to cut (meat) into strips; fleck.
Derivatives:
Hence vlekking verbal noun, flecking (see fleck).
1986 C. Kirstein Best S. Afr. Braai Recipes 11‘Vlekking’ and salting.
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