Sunday house, noun phrase

Origin:
South African Dutch
A house in town which is used by a country family during their visits to attend church; church house; kerkhuis, see Kerk sense 2; nagmaalhuis, see Nagmaal sense 3; tuishuis; Zondagshuis.
[1851 R. Gray Jrnls of Two Visitations 11Many of the Dutch farmers have built small houses for themselves, which they occupy during the ‘nacht maal’ (communion), and occasionally when they come in on a Sunday.]
1876 Cape Argus 19 Oct. 3Large family residences, which are known in this place as ‘Sunday houses,’ being used only on Sundays by families who come in from country farms to the Sunday services.
1929 W.M. Macmillan Bantu, Boer & Briton 300 (Swart)On this assumption, the Volksraad had promised burghers an erf for a ‘Sunday house’, to be used on visits to markets and Nachtmaal.
1967 C. De Villiers in C.M. Booysen More Tales of S. Afr. 243The Sunday houses are gradually being abandoned — the ease of the motor-car making the long outspan for the horse-drawn Cape Cart no longer a necessity.
1975 S. Afr. Panorama Sept. 37A few private houses with their verandahs bordering the street. In the old days, they were ‘little Sunday houses’ where the farmers stayed when they came into town for ‘Nagmaal’ (communion services).
A house in town which is used by a country family during their visits to attend church; church house; kerkhuis, see Kerk2; nagmaalhuis, see Nagmaal3; tuishuis; Zondagshuis.

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18511975