slagter, noun

Forms:
Also slaghter.
Origin:
South African Dutch, DutchShow more South African Dutch, from Dutch slachter.
obs.
a. A butcher.
1822 [see slagter’s brief at sense b].
a1878 J. Montgomery Reminisc. (1981) 90The slagter bills were printed on a half sheet of foolscap, and had a neat border round them — the slagter binding all his movable and immovable property, and his wife and children, to fulfil the payment. An open space was left for his agent to fill in the number of sheep or cattle and the amount purchased.
b. combinations
slagter bill, slagter’s brief /-brif/ [see brief], a butcher’s note of purchase;
slagter’s knecht /-knɛxt/ [see knecht], a butcher’s agent (see quotation 1822).
a1878slagter bill: [see sense a].
1822 W.J. Burchell Trav. I. 201The farm of Pieter Jacobs..was visited at this time by a slagter’s knegt (butcher’s man), for the purpose of purchasing a large number of sheep. A slagter’s knegt is a person commissioned by a butcher in Cape Town to travel into the grazing districts, and buy up the number of sheep or oxen he may require for which the man pays the grazier, not in money, but in small notes of hand, called Slagter’s brief, previously signed by his employer, and the validity of which is certified at the Fiscal’s office.
1824 W.J. Burchell Trav. II. 19Not even the butcher’s man, or slagters knegt, ever made his appearance at this distant farm; although the owner possessed a flock of not less that four thousand sheep.
1824 W.J. Burchell Trav. II. 178The place we were in..was now used only for the accommodation of ‘slagter’s knegts’ and visitors.
1861 P.B. Borcherds Auto-Biog. Mem. 56Most of their sheep were disposed of on their farms to butchers’ itinerant servants..generally Germans or other foreigners, and commonly known as slaghter’s knechts.
A butcher.
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18221878