Section 10, noun phrase

Forms:
Also Section Ten.
Origin:
Referring to sections of Acts so numbered.
historical
1. a. Section 10.1 of the Natives (Urban Areas) Consolidation Act (No.25 of 1945 as amended), the law which formerly controlled and limited the rights of black people to live and work in urban areas; used allusively, with reference to the application of this law or to the rights granted in terms of it; ten one, see ten sense a. Often attributive, especially in the phrase Section 10 rights. b. Occasionally, one having Section 10 rights, a Section Tenner (see below). See also illegal, influx control.
Note:
The Act was repealed in 1986.
[1945 Act 25 in Stat. of Union 130Restriction of right of natives to enter an urban area for certain purposes. 10.(1) The Governor-General shall, if requested to do so by a resolution adopted by a duly constituted meeting of any urban local authority, by proclamation in the Gazette, declare that from and after a date to be specified therein no native shall enter the urban area under the jurisdiction of that urban local authority for the purpose of seeking or taking up employment or residing therein, otherwise than in accordance with conditions to be prescribed by the Governor-General in that proclamation.]
1964 M. Benson Afr. Patriots 265‘Endorsing out’ was the Government’s euphemism for driving out Africans from urban areas to reserves under the notorious Section 10 of the Urban Areas Act. No African might be in an urban area for more than seventy-two hours unless he or she had resided there for fifteen years or worked with the same employer for ten years, or had a discretionary permit to reside and work there.
1977 J. Sikakane Window on Soweto 43A white labour official..maintained that it was illegal to have been issued with a reference book in Natal for a Jo’burg Section Ten.
1979 Pace Sept. 84If you were born in 1951 and your family removed from that area in 1952 only to return in 1979, we are afraid that you may have forfeited your Section 10 rights in Odendaalsrus.
1980 Sunday Times 2 Nov. 12The ‘insiders’ are all those people — and their descendants — who currently hold the precious Section 10 rights enabling them to live and work in urban areas.
1982 Pace Nov. 74He hanged himself...Section Ten, you know? Influx Control.
1985 Probe Oct. 8The..controversial section 10 practice which has kept black people out of South Africa’s cities, [seems] to be on the way out.
1986 P. Maylam Hist. of Afr. People 180These unfortunates were the people who could be ‘endorsed out’ of urban areas for not possessing section 10 rights under the 1952 Native Laws Amendment Act (and its subsequent amendments).
1987 Frontline Feb. 13A science graduate, a lecturer at a motor firm..needed help getting the magical Section 10 rights of a permanent resident so that he could bring his wife and six-year-old daughter to live with him.
2. Section 10 of the Internal Security Act, which provides for detention without trial.
1982 Staffrider Vol.4 No.4, 41If you persist with your activities in Wetonia I shall have no option but to lock you up under Section Ten, and you know what that means.
1987 A. Klaaste in Tribute Feb.Mar. 48Mr M— and sundry other pillars of black society are spending several months in jail under Section 10 of the Internal Security Act (as it was then called).
Section 10.1 of the Natives (Urban Areas) Consolidation Act (No.25 of 1945 as amended), the law which formerly controlled and limited the rights of black people to live and work in urban areas; used allusively, with reference to the application of this law or to the rights granted in terms of it; ten one, see tena. Often attributive, especially in the phrase Section 10 rights.
Occasionally, one having Section 10 rights, a Section Tenner (see below).
Section 10 of the Internal Security Act, which provides for detention without trial.
Derivatives:
Hence Section Tenner noun phrase, one with the right to live and work in a particular urban area in terms of this law (cf. sense 1 b above); ten one, see ten sense b.
1977 J. Sikakane Window on Soweto 43I was a Section Tenner, having been born in Soweto, and being the daughter of a man who also qualified.

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19451987

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