put, verb

transitive. Colloquial. In the phrase to put foot, to use the accelerator on a motor vehicle; so (figurative), to ‘get a move on’, to hurry. Cf. to tread tackie (see tackie sense 1 c).
1981 L. & P. Robertson-Hotz in Bloody Horse Jan.Feb. 32Now we’d better put foot; we’ve only got a couple of hours before they discover we’ve escaped.
1989 T. Botha in Style June 108A love story about the long open road, putting foot, fly-bitten caffies, ver verlate vlaktes as well as the art of sleep-driving at 120km/h.
1990 G. Betrix on TV1, 21 Apr.They know that they (sc. show-jumpers) really have to put foot, so to speak, if they want to have a chance in the competition.
1991 M.J. Silva Informant, GrahamstownI’ve got to meet him at the video shop. Come on Dad, put foot.
to use the accelerator on a motor vehicle; so (figurative), to ‘get a move on’, to hurry.
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