klimop, noun

Origin:
South African Dutch, DutchShow more South African Dutch, transferred use of Dutch klimop ivy, klim climb + op up.
1. Any of several species of Clematis of Ranunculaceae, especially C. brachiata.
1860 Harvey & Sonder Flora Capensis I. 2Clematis...One species is wild in England, and many are cultivated in gardens. The colonial name for the Cape species is ‘Klimop’.
1983 M.M. Kidd Cape Peninsula 62Clematis brachiata. Ranunculaceae. Klimop. Woody climber; rare in Constantia Valley.
2. Any of several species of creeping or climbing plants, especially species of Cynanchum (family Asclepiadaceae), all of which are poisonous to livestock, causing krimpsiekte; also called monkey-rope. Also attributive. See also Dawidjies sense b.
1893 Henning in D.G. Steyn Toxicology of Plants (1934) 347This stage..of krimpsiekte..endures a longer or shorter time depending upon the quantity of the Klimop eaten, and the individual susceptibility to the poison.
1972 M.R. Levyns in Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. VI. 413Klimop, Bobbejaantou. Monkey-rope. (Cynanchum obtusifolium; C. africanum.) Common twiners of the family Asclepiadaceae, found in the bushes near the coast.
3. combination.
klimopgras /-xras/ [Afrikaans gras grass], see quotation 1966.
1966 C.A. Smith Common Names 296Klim(op)gras, Olyra latifolia..: A perennial grass, with culms up to 15 ft high and scrambling over other plants...Potamophila prehensilis...A perennial grass, up to several feet high...The vernacular name is in allusion to the climbing habit. Said to be a good fodder plant. Both species are found only in damp places in bush or woods.
Any of several species of Clematis of Ranunculaceae, especially C. brachiata.
Any of several species of creeping or climbing plants, especially species of Cynanchum (family Asclepiadaceae), all of which are poisonous to livestock, causing krimpsiekte; also called monkey-rope. Also attributive.

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