isidwaba, noun

Forms:
Also sidwaba.
Origin:
Zulu
A pleated hide skirt or kilt worn by a Zulu woman as a sign of betrothal or marriage; transferred sense, the woman who wears such a skirt.
1956 J. Chatterton Return of Drums 22She has large holes in the lobes of her ears, a sign that she had at one time been a heathen, a sidwaba — one who wears a skin skirt.
1964 G. Campbell Old Dusty 2We hailed them at this unexpected strip-tease exhibition to warn them of our presence, when, with a great deal of screaming and giggling, they grabbed up their isidwabas, while we strolled back to..our camping site.
1967 O. Walker Hippo Poacher 128I undid my isidwaba (hide skirt) gently and rolled it up.
1976 West & Morris Abantu 40The bride wears her new black leather skirt, the isidwaba of a married woman.
1978 A. Elliott Sons of Zulu 169Important developments take place in the courtship sequence...She..has to discard her girl’s skirt and don the leatherpleated skirt or sidwaba of a woman.
1988 L. Kaunda in Pace Oct. 50A black isidwaba (cowhide skirt), leopard skins and intricate beadware.
A pleated hide skirt or kilt worn by a Zulu woman as a sign of betrothal or marriage; transferred sense, the woman who wears such a skirt.

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

19561988