Gqunukhwebe, plural noun

Forms:
Amagonakwaybie, AmagonakwebiShow more Also Amagonakwaybie, Amagonakwebi, Amagqunukwebe, Amagqunukwebi, Amagunuquabi, Amakunugubi, Gonakwebu, Gonokwabie, Gonokwebie, Gunukwebe, Gunukwebi.
Origin:
Xhosa, KhoikhoiShow more Xhosa, (plural prefix ama- +) noun stem -Gqunukhwebe, adaptation of Khoikhoi Gonaqua (see Gonaqua).
historical
Collectively, the members of a people of mixed Khoikhoi and Xhosa descent, living during the 19th century in what is now the Eastern Cape; also called Gonaqua(s), see Gonaqua sense 1. Also attributive or as adjective.
Note:
As is the case with many names of peoples and groups in South African English, this word has been found only in plural uses; however, it may be that it has also been used in unrecorded singular forms.
1829 W. Shaw Diary. 6 Oct.The Governor held a Meeting with the Chiefs..Pato, Kama and Congo of the Amagonakwaybie Tribe..this morning.
1836 J.M. Bowker Speeches & Sel. (1864) 20The Gonokwebie and Fingo chiefs.
1836 J.M. Bowker Speeches & Sel. (1864) 23I am happy to report that no thefts of colonial cattle have been traced to either the Gonokwabies, or the Fingoes.
c1847 H.H. Dugmore in J. Maclean Compendium of Kafir Laws (1906) 7The Amagqunukwebi extend along the sea-coast from the mouth of the Fish River nearly to that of the Buffalo, reaching between the Fish River and the Keiskamma, to the sources of the Beka.
1852 M.B. Hudson S. Afr. Frontier Life p.xiOn the other side of the boundary line were, firstly, the Amakunugubi: a small tribe, of which Pato is chief...The port of the Buffalo (East London) is situated in his location.
1920 S.M. Molema Bantu Past & Present 33The Ama-Gqunukwebe of Kwane were also half Hottentots, and half Xosa in descent.
c1960 J.M. Donald in J.B. Bullock Peddie — Settlers’ Outpost 60Theophilus Shepstone,..then the Resident Agent for the Fingoes and the Gunukwebis..stationed at Fort Peddie.
1970 M.F. Katzen in Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. V. 56The Xhosa had intermarried with Hottentot tribes (to produce the Gunukwebe clans) and were living in the Gamtoos River area until 1778 when they moved back to the Fish.
1986 P. Maylam Hist. of Afr. People 98At one time the Gqunukhwebe threatened Port Elizabeth...Phato, the Gqunukhwebe chief..continued an intermittent, harassing style of resistance into 1847.
1989 J.B. Peires Dead Will Arise p.xiiThe most important of the minor chiefdoms was that of the Gqunukhwebe Xhosa, led by Phatho and his junior brother Kama.
Collectively, the members of a people of mixed Khoikhoi and Xhosa descent, living during the 19th century in what is now the Eastern Cape; also called Gonaqua(s), see Gonaqua1. Also attributive or as adjective.

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18291989