droog-my-keel, noun

Forms:
drag-mij-kell, droog-m’-keelShow more Formerly also drag-mij-kell, droog-m’-keel, droog-mij-keel, droog-mijn-keel.
Origin:
Afrikaans, South African DutchShow more Afrikaans (earlier South African Dutch), literally ‘dry-my-throat’, droog dry + my my + keel throat.
Any of several plant species which bear astringent fruits: 1. Either of two species of Vitaceae (grape-vine family): a. Rhoicissus tridentata; also called wild grape (sense 1 a); b. the wild grape (sense 1 c), Cyphostemma cirrhosum. 2. The cat-thorn (sense 2 a), Scutia myrtina. In all senses also called drogie, dry-my-throat. Also attributive.
Note:
Used medicinally by early colonists, especially for the treatment of throat infections.
1898 E. Glanville in Empire 8 Oct. (Pettman)He marched off to a clump of drag-mij-kell bush about a hundred yards off.
1917 R. Marloth Dict. of Common Names of Plants 24Droog-mijn-keel, Cissus cirrhosa. Nearly allied to our wild grape, but the fruit contains such a powerful irritant that a single berry, if chewed, will cause great pain, hence the vernacular name. The same name applied to Scutia Commersonii.
1932 Watt & Breyer-Brandwijk Medicinal & Poisonous Plants 116The Mapulanas use the juice of the bulbous root of Cissus cirrhosa.., Droog-my-keel, with water as a gargle, as an internal remedy, and as an application to glandular swellings and creeping sores.
c1955 M. Hume Sawdust Heaven 45Her throat was dry, as though she had been eating the blue-black berries of the droog-my-keel.
1965 J. Bennett Hawk Alone 76The land fell away towards the river in a broad sweep of prickly pear and droog-m’-keel and mimosa.
1971 Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. IV. 89Droog-my-keel, This name, sometimes in the form droog-my-keelbos(sie), is used in a very wide sense, being applied in various localities to several indigenous plants whose fruits when eaten or tasted cause a drying of the throat due to astringency.
1972 A. Scholefield Wild Dog Running 126The little valleys were heavy with mimosa and kei-apple, wild olive and sneeze-wood, Caffre thorn and boerboons and droog-mij-keel bushes.
Rhoicissus tridentata; also called wild grape (sense 1 a);
the wild grape (sense 1 c), Cyphostemma cirrhosum.
The cat-thorn (sense 2 a), Scutia myrtina. In all senses also called drogie, dry-my-throat. Also attributive.
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18981972