chick, noun

Origin:
Shortened form of chicken feather.
Ostrich-farming
A body feather taken from an immature ostrich; chicken feather. Also attributive. See also feather sense a, juvenal, spadona.
1896 R. Wallace Farming Indust. of Cape Col. 233All kinds of ostrich feathers, including ‘Dark Chicks,’ worth 2s. per lb., and ‘Prime Whites,’ worth many pounds sterling per lb., are included.
1902 Agric. Jrnl of Cape of G.H. XX. 721Chicks £0.1.0 — £0.1.6.
1909 J.E. Duerden in Agric. Jrnl of Cape of G.H. XXXIV. 519With the fourth plumage, ‘second-after-chicks,’ the valuable wingquills of both the cock and the hen have reached their full size and show their best characteristics...With the high feeding now largely followed the..first-after-chicks show almost mature characteristics.
1955 G. Aschman in Saron & Hotz Jews in S. Afr. 130The different types of feathers that the ostrich produces — chicks, wings, bodies.
1973 D.J. Maree in Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. VIII. 398The first feathers are taken..at the age of six to eight months — the wings are known in the trade as ‘spadonas’ and the body feathers as ‘chicks’.
A body feather taken from an immature ostrich; chicken feather. Also attributive.

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

18961973