bluebottle, noun

Origin:
Australian EnglishShow more Probably from Australian English (the Australian National Dictionary records a context from 1911 in which the word is used in this sense).
The Portuguese man-o’-war, the marine siphonophore Physalia physalis, characterized by a blue, balloon-like float, and trailing tentacles which inflict painful, sometimes dangerous stings. Also attributive.
1918 S.H. Skaife Animal Life in S. Afr. 11The well-known blue-bottle, or Portuguese man-o-war..consists, not of one animal, but of a number joined together..it is a colony of animals...Those cast up on our shore are generally from one to two inches across.
1947 L.G. Green Tavern of Seas 143A seashore strewn with physalia, better known as blue-bottles or Portuguese men-’o-war, is no place for bare feet...The pain a blue-bottle can inflict is maddening.
1972 Daily Dispatch 16 Feb. 1Warm waters and easterly winds have brought sporadic oil and blue bottles to East London’s beaches.
1982 Weekend Argus 4 Dec. 1Bluebottle tendrils are up to two metres long. They contain tiny arrow-like barbs which penetrate the flesh and contain poison which causes intense irritation and swelling.
1990 Style July 105The clan have retired to the sparkling pool in the garden (planned to circumvent the bluebottle and wind problem).
The Portuguese man-o’-war, the marine siphonophore Physalia physalis, characterized by a blue, balloon-like float, and trailing tentacles which inflict painful, sometimes dangerous stings. Also attributive.
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