banning order, noun phrase

Origin:
EnglishShow more banning + English order injunction.
historical
a. A document setting out the terms under which an individual’s freedom of movement, association, speech, and action are restricted, and issued by ministerial decree in terms of security legislation. b. The conditions under which a ‘banned’ person is restricted. Also transferred sense, and jocular. In both senses also called ban noun, restriction order (see restriction sense 2).
Note:
The principal Acts in terms of which the Minister of Justice might impose a banning order were the Suppression of Communism Act, which introduced the concept in 1950, and the Internal Security Act.
1962 A.J. Luthuli Let my People Go 214I had seven days’ grace before the banning order took effect.
1974 Daily Dispatch 22 Feb. 16We could not carry our drink out of the lounge...When we saw the banning order just served verbally upon Mr Klaas could not be lifted we marched out and went to Cream Bowl Restaurant.
1979 Survey of Race Rel. 1978 (S.A.I.R.R.) 102On 11 May Mr Justice Philips in the Pretoria Supreme Court in an important judgement found that Ms Sheila Weinberg was guilty of contravening her banning order by having lunch with a friend; this constituted a social gathering.
1983 C. Saunders Hist. Dict. 20The typical ‘banning order’..restricted an individual to a magisterial district, required him or her to report regularly to the police, prevented anything said by the person from being quoted,..and prevented him or her from meeting socially with more than one person at a time...There was no appeal to the courts against a banning order, which was usually for five years, often renewed thereafter.
1990 Weekend Argus 17 Feb. 4From 1959 onwards, he was served with a series of banning orders and was frequently arrested for not being in possession of a resident’s permit.
1991 C. St Leger in Sunday Times 26 May 12Both Dr Naude and the institute fell under the scrutiny of the security police and he was served with a banning order which effectively gagged him for 15 years.
A document setting out the terms under which an individual’s freedom of movement, association, speech, and action are restricted, and issued by ministerial decree in terms of security legislation.
The conditions under which a ‘banned’ person is restricted. Also transferred sense, and jocular. In both senses also called bannoun, restriction orderrestriction2.
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19621991