anker, noun

Origin:
DutchShow more Dutch, liquid measure of 38.8 litres.
obs. except in historical contexts
A unit of liquid measurement formerly in use at the Cape, equivalent to 7,5 to 8,5 imperial gallons (36 to 38 litres), being a quarter of one aum; the vessel containing this amount. Also attributive. See also stukvat.
1833 S. Afr. Almanac & Dir. 41Liquid Measure: 16 Flasks, equal to 1 Anker — 4 Ankers equal to 1 Aum.
1843 J.C. Chase Cape of G.H. 192An Anker is equal to 9½ Dutch gallons or about 7 11/12ths Imper.
1861 E. Prov. Yr Bk & Annual Register 61An anker is equal to 9½ Dutch gals., or about 7 7–11 im.
c1936 S. & E. Afr. Yr Bk & Guide 10091 anker = 9½ Dutch Gallons= 7½ Eng. Gals.
1964 L.G. Green Old Men Say 100Look up the market prices in the Cape Argus, and you will find that as late as 1859..Dutch weights and measures were..in everyday use...Measurers of capacity were the ‘anker’ and the ‘legger’ barrels and casks.
1968 W. Kempen in D.J. Opperman Spirit of Vine 285Anker, An eight-gallon barrel. Origin unspecified, but no connection with ‘anchor’.
1971 R. Raven-Hart (tr. of F.A. Bolling’s Oost-Indiske Reise-Bog) in Cape G.H. 1652–1702 I. 144That same day the Captain announced that whoever first sighted land would receive a fresh-milk cheese, a new hat..a little keg (‘Anker’) of brandy, and 4 Rixdollars in cash.
1972 [see leaguer].
A unit of liquid measurement formerly in use at the Cape, equivalent to 7,5 to 8,5 imperial gallons (36 to 38 litres), being a quarter of one aum; the vessel containing this amount. Also attributive.
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18331971