AAC, noun

In historical contexts. Initial letters of All-African Convention, a confederation of black political movements founded in 1935 to co-ordinate resistance to Prime Minister J.B.M. Hertzog’s bills for the disenfranchisement of the Cape’s black voters. See also Hertzog Bills.
Note:
Later absorbed by the Non-European Unity Movement (see NEUM).
[1935 Rand Daily Mail 17 Dec. 20About 400 delegates from all parts of the Union..are attending a special all-African Convention in the Bathu Location, Bloemfontein, to discuss the Native Bills.]
1941 C.A. Kuse in Bantu World 1 Mar. 4We will have no constituted cooperation with political organisations like the A.A.C.
1959 E. Mphahlele Down Second Ave 188It was later in 1955 that I joined the African National Congress (ANC). I had for some years been torn between it and the All-African Convention (AAC).
1964 M. Benson Afr. Patriots 86Another question that disrupted African unity was whether the A.A.C. should continue. Despite hot opposition from A.N.C. leaders, Jabavu obtained majority support in advocating its permanence...The emergence of this rival organization, coming on top of the A.N.C.’s failure to lead the opposition to the Hertzog bills, shocked some of its members into a decision.
1989 Reader’s Digest Illust. Hist. of S. Afr. 339The threat to the Cape vote provoked a broad revival of African political activity, and on 16 December 1935, more than 400 delegates from every corner of South Africa..gathered in Bloemfontein for the founding conference of the All-African Convention. The leading lights of the AAC were Professor Davidson Jabavu and Dr Alfred Xuma.
Initial letters of All-African Convention, a confederation of black political movements founded in 1935 to co-ordinate resistance to Prime Minister J.B.M. Hertzog’s bills for the disenfranchisement of the Cape’s black voters.
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