DSAE test file

South African, adjectival phrase and noun phrase

A. adjectival phrase 1. Before 1910: Of or pertaining to southern Africa or its inhabitants. 2. Between 1910 and 1961: Of or pertaining to the Union of South Africa or its inhabitants. 3. After 1961: Of or pertaining to the Republic of South Africa or its inhabitants; SA adjective.
1824 S. Afr. Jrnl I. 29Poor Gert Schepers, a Vee Boer of the Cradock District, was less fortunate in an encounter with a South African lion.
1989 P. Cull in E. Prov. Herald 7 Feb. 7The ANC..was..‘as South African as any of us here,’ the deputy-leader of the Labour Party..said yesterday.
4. In the special collocation South African English: a. Those varieties of English spoken by South Africans. b. The South African English (plural.): South African English-speakers collectively; see also Essa.
1909 J.W. Wessels in State Dec. 702Do you..believe that there will be in the remote future a type of English known as South African English?
1986 N. Wrench in Style Dec. 53His outburst on Midweek..added a new word to South African English.
B. noun phrase 1. Before 1910: An inhabitant of southern Africa. 2. Between 1910 and 1961: A citizen or inhabitant of the Union of South Africa. 3. Since 1961: A citizen or inhabitant of the Republic of South Africa. See also SA noun1.
1867 Cape Town Mail & Advertiser in L. Lloyd Notes of Trav. (1969) 332Mr Andersson, though a Swede by birth, was half an Englishman by blood, and quite a South African by adoption.
1991 Sunday Times 14 July (Extra) 8Now that the Population Registration Act is gone Mrs Robertson wants to see a single, non-racial welfare department...‘They are all South Africans now and parity is the answer...
4. Absolute uses of the adjective.
Note:
Quotation 1930 refers to shares on the stock market.
1930 Economist (U.K.) 8 Nov. 866South Africans remained firm.
1969 Guardian (U.K.) 24 Oct. 9You will need some medium-dry sherry...You could go for a good South African at about £1.
5. nonce. A hypothetical language common to all South Africans.
1990 R. Van Tonder in Frontline Sept. 27Nobody can speak ‘South African’. There is no such language or culture and never has been.
Before 1910: Of or pertaining to southern Africa or its inhabitants.
Between 1910 and 1961: Of or pertaining to the Union of South Africa or its inhabitants.
After 1961: Of or pertaining to the Republic of South Africa or its inhabitants; SAadjective.
Those varieties of English spoken by South Africans.
South African English-speakers collectively;
Before 1910: An inhabitant of southern Africa.
Between 1910 and 1961: A citizen or inhabitant of the Union of South Africa.
Since 1961: A citizen or inhabitant of the Republic of South Africa.
A hypothetical language common to all South Africans.
Derivatives:
Hence South Africana noun phrase nonce, artefacts which are characteristically South African (cf. Africana); South Africanize transitive verbal phrase, to make (something) South African in nature; South Africanness noun phrase, the quality of being South African.
1985 Cape Times 25 Nov.A lovely tongue-in-cheek look at South Africana, of which Van’s home is the epitome: Springbok trophies (two nogal!) at the entrance, fur-on-the-dashboard cars and veldskoens.
1990 Sunday Times 30 Sept. 18They use the tune, the refrain and the idea of the song, South Africanising the words with not too much wit or invention.

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18241991