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Last Outpost, noun phrase

Origin:
In this sense, coined by Tommy Bedford in the early 1970s, responding to a perceived bias against Natal players by the national rugby selectors, who were said to look on Natal as though it were not a part of South Africa but still belonged to the British Empire.
In full the Last Outpost of the British Empire: a jocular name for the province of KwaZulu-Natal (formerly called Natal), or sometimes for the city of Durban, alluding to a perceived isolationism, and a supposed adherence to all things British, among its English-speaking inhabitants. Also attributive.
1988 E. Platter in Style Aug. 58Is Natal the Last Outpost? Are Natalians a breed apart?..Our Last Outpost image died years ago. We were very anti-Republic here.
1993 Sunday Nation 8 Aug. 30So why come to Durban, the ‘Last Outpost’..?
a jocular name for the province of KwaZulu-Natal (formerly called Natal), or sometimes for the city of Durban, alluding to a perceived isolationism, and a supposed adherence to all things British, among its English-speaking inhabitants. Also attributive.
Derivatives:
Hence Last Outposter noun phrase, an inhabitant of KwaZulu-Natal.
1992 W. Knowler in Weekend Mercury 4 Jan. 6New year saw the New South Africa cocking one helluva snook at the Last Outposters.

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