Black Sash, noun phrase

Origin:
Named for the broad black sashes worn by members at protest vigils as a symbol of mourning.
a. obs. A protest campaign by the Women’s Defence of the Constitution League, organized in opposition to the disenfranchisement of ‘coloured’ voters, and characterized by members wearing black sashes as they stood in silent protest. Also attributive.
1955 Sunday Times in M. Rogers Black Sash (1956) 99What can the majority do but protest again and again? This is what the Women’s Defence of the Constitution League has been doing, through the Black Sash movement.
1956 Friend in M. Rogers Black Sash (1956) 64Bloemfontein’s ‘Black Sash’ women members of the Defence of the Constitution League were here, there and everywhere in the city yesterday.
b. A name given by the Press to the Women’s Defence of the Constitution League, and adopted as its official title; Sash noun. Also attributive. See also sash verb.
Note:
The Black Sash works for the protection and advancement of civil rights through protest, research, and the maintenance of a network of advice offices (see advice office).
1956 M. Rogers Black Sash 227The Women’s Defence of the Constitution League decided at this conference..in the light of the changed constitutional circumstances to change its name to ‘The Black Sash.’
1962 A.J. Luthuli Let my People Go 213A further meeting was fitted in in Rondebosch — the Black Sash wanted me.
1970 E.D. Stott in Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. II. 353With the passing of the Senate Act, the Black Sash turned its attention to all other legislation considered unjust or a deprivation of civil rights and liberties, which it was constituted to uphold.
1978 Daily Dispatch 14 July 1The Black Sash is a women’s protest organisation formed in the 1950’s to draw attention to injustices in South African society.
1980 E. Joubert Long Journey of Poppie Nongena 237She considered the Black Sash people and the Legal Aid that Mrs Retief once said would help her.
1987 New Nation 2 Apr. 2Nobel Prize for Sash? The Black Sash has been nominated for the 1987 Nobel Peace Prize — becoming the first South African organisation to be nominated for the prestigious award.
1990 E. Prov. Herald 5 Mar. 4She said..the Black Sash..should retain its independent role of monitoring and fostering human rights, rather than seeking political power or influence.
A protest campaign by the Women’s Defence of the Constitution League, organized in opposition to the disenfranchisement of ‘coloured’ voters, and characterized by members wearing black sashes as they stood in silent protest. Also attributive.
A name given by the Press to the Women’s Defence of the Constitution League, and adopted as its official title; Sashnoun. Also attributive.
Derivatives:
Hence Black Sash transitive verb, sash verb; Black Sasher noun phrase, a member of the Black Sash; Sasher, see Sash noun; Black Sashing verbal noun phrase; Black Sashism noun phrase (rare), the practices, ideals, and policies of the Black Sash.
1955 J. Mervis in M. Rogers Black Sash (1956) 72Black Sashism has become accepted practice in South Africa.
1956 M. Rogers Black Sash 57By the time he had been ‘black sashed’ twice, he managed to raise a smile, and looked the women straight in the face.
1956 Melbourne Herald (Australia) in M. Rogers Black Sash 70At a ceremonial opening of a police barracks, the Minister of Justice, Mr C.R. Swart, scrambled over a fence to avoid walking through the Black Sashers’ gauntlet.
1956 P. Wolstenholme in M. Rogers Black Sash 256These things are best left to the women, who after all tackle all the hardest jobs, such as street collecting and Black Sashing.
1965 W. Jackson in Black Sash Vol.9 No.2, 32As I stood around shivering, I noticed a long line of Black Sashers standing at the edge of the quay-side.
1971 J. Robertson Liberalism in S. Afr. 141The Black Sashers were initially concerned with the preservation of the Constitution and with promoting the unity of the white races in South Africa.
Entry Navigation

Visualise Quotations

Quotation summary

Senses

19551990