volk, noun

Forms:
Also with initial capital.
Plurals:
unchanged, or volke /ˈfɔlkə/.
Origin:
Dutch, AfrikaansShow more Dutch and Afrikaans.
1.
a. As plural : People; members of a particular group, or citizens of a country.
1827 T. Philipps Scenes & Occurrences 20They style themselves Africaners, and distinguish all those who come from even any part of Europe as Vaderland Volk, or Fatherland people.
1987 Frontline Feb. 5The English-speaking Volk should tell the Government what it can do with its attempts to foster ‘white unity’.
b. Plural volke A people, a nation.
[1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. I. 26The people far up the country, on the appearance of strangers are us’d to say in Dutch, wat volk i.e. What People.]
1993 Sunday Times 23 May 23They celebrate..the Voortrekker leaders as their heroes. But this..builds only a parochial volk, not a nation.
2. As plural : Among Afrikaans-speakers: ‘coloured’ or black farm-workers; rural coloured people; folks, see folk sense a. Cf. volkies.
1871 J. Mackenzie Ten Yrs N. of Orange River 65‘Volk’ is used by them (sc. Dutch colonists) of all coloured people, and never of white persons...The Griquas sought a place where they might again become ‘menschen’ and cease to be ‘volk’ and ‘schepsels’ (creatures).
1987 M. Melamu Children of Twilight 41It was all so different with his ‘volk’. You had to feed them properly...Mealie pap and sour milk, with the occasional offal which he knew the blacks liked so much.
3. Denoting the Afrikaner people.
a. Obsolete except in historical contexts Het Volk /het ˈfɔlk/ [South African Dutch het the], ‘The People’.
i. The name of a political party, founded by Generals L. Botha and J.C. Smuts in 1905, which merged with other groups to form the Suid Afrikaansche Nasionale Party (see SAP noun1 sense 1 a) after Union in 1910. Also attributive.
1905 Star 2 Oct. 6In marked contrast to the active propaganda of the Head Committee of ‘Het Volk’ we have the almost studied silence of the largest section of the community on the subject of education.
1989 Reader’s Digest Illust. Hist. of S. Afr. 270By the time Botha and Smuts had established Het Volk as a political association in January 1905, they had begun to formulate a policy of reconciliation with Britain.
ii. As pl. : The citizens of a Boer republic. Cf. sense 3 b.
1926 M. Nathan S. Afr. from Within 22If any measure of importance was to be taken, a meeting of Het volk (the people) was summoned to sanction it.
1968 E.A. Walker Hist. of Sn Afr. 204At Thaba Nchu, ‘Het Volk’ (the People) elected Maritz, a man of some education and legal experience as Landdrost.
b. Usually the volk or die volk /di -/ [Afrikaans, die the]. The (members of the) Afrikaner group or ‘nation’; folk sense b. Cf. Afrikanerdom sense 1, Boerenasie sense 1, Boerevolk sense 1. Also attributive. See also mens noun sense 1 a.
1948 Press Digest No.1, 8Die Volksblad thought it essential that a knowledge of Bantu history, tradition, customs and language be acquired by school children and eventually, in consequence, by the volk as a whole.
1993 Natal Witness 13 Apr. 3Rudolph said the weapons he had stolen in 1990 had been distributed to ‘the volk (nation) which had been unarmed and still stood defenceless against the onslaught of those who wanted to take our land’.
c. Phrases die volk daar buite, the volk daar buite [Afrikaans die volk daar buite, die the + volk people + daar buite ‘out there’], the Afrikaner electorate; for Volk and Vaderland, Volk and Vaderland, (for) people and country; see also Vaderland noun.
1970 Argus 30 Jan. 11While the nation watches Parliament with more than usual interest during the short pre-election session, its members will be watching ‘die volk daar buite’ with even closer interest.
1991 J. Pauw In Heart of Whore 100The ‘90-day Act’..created a sub-culture in the police force that encouraged policemen to act mercilessly in their struggle against communism and in the protection of Volk and Vaderland.
4. combinations (Always in the Afrikaans combining form volks-.)
volksbeweging /-bəˌvɪəxəŋ/ [Afrikaans, beweging movement], a people’s movement;
volkseie /-eɪə/ [Afrikaans, eie own], national or ‘folk’ ethos;
volksfees /-fɪəs/, plural volksfeeste /-tə/ [Afrikaans, fees feast, festival], people’s or ‘national’ festival;
volksidentiteit /-identiˈteɪt/ [Afrikaans, identiteit identity], cultural identity;
volkskongres /-kɔŋˌxres/ [Afrikaans, kongres congress], a national congress of Afrikaans-speaking people;
volksleër /-lɪər/ [Afrikaans, leër army], a ‘people’s army’; a name often given to right-wing private armies or paramilitary groups;
volksleier /-leɪə(r)/ [Afrikaans, leier leader], a popular leader of the Afrikaans people;
volksvreemd /-frɪəmt/ adjective, also (attributive) volksvreemde /-də/, [Afrikaans, vreemd strange, alien (attributive form vreemde)], alien to the people and their interests;
volkswil /-vəl/ [Afrikaans, wil will], the will of the people, the ‘national will’.
1980 Sunday Times 16 Mar. 15If, in the first flush of enthusiasm and conviction, the Nationalists (seen as a volksbeweging rather than as a political party) could not make separatism work, they certainly cannot do so now.
1978 Sunday Times 24 Sept. 16History will never forgive those 170-odd men if they do not take account of national opinion, the volkswil, in making their selection.
People; members of a particular group, or citizens of a country.
A people, a nation.
‘coloured’ or black farm-workers; rural coloured people; folks, see folka.
Denoting the Afrikaner people.
‘The People’.
The name of a political party, founded by Generals L. Botha and J.C. Smuts in 1905, which merged with other groups to form the Suid Afrikaansche Nasionale PartySAPnoun1 a after Union in 1910. Also attributive.
The citizens of a Boer republic.
The (members of the) Afrikaner group or ‘nation’; folkb.
the Afrikaner electorate; for Volk and Vaderland, Volk and Vaderland, (for) people and country;