DSAE test file

stiver, stuiver, noun

Forms:
stuiwer, stuyverShow more Also stuiwer, stuyver, styver.
Origin:
DutchShow more Dutch stuiver, of obscure origin.
historical
Note:
Not exclusively South African English.
1. The smallest monetary unit in use at the Cape under the Dutch East India Company, being the sixth part of a schelling (or skilling) and the forty-eighth part of a rix-dollar, roughly equivalent to a half-penny sterling. See also dubbeltje noun2 sense 1.
1697 W. Dampier in R. Raven-Hart Cape G.H. 1652–1702 (1971) 382A Flask of Wine which holds 3 quarts will cost 18 stivers, for so much I paid for it.
1981 Flying Springbok Dec. 55The first postal ‘stamping’ of letters in the Cape came into operation of 2 March 1792. The stamp indicated that 6 stuivers had been paid to the ‘Vereenigde Nederlandsche Oost-Indische Compagnie’ for the conveyance of the letter.
2. figurative. A little; a small amount; something of little value.
1822 W.J. Burchell Trav. I. 248The weather being a little chilly, the mother, in the true colonial style, observed that, down in the Karro, it was only a stuyver cold, but that we should find a ducatoon cold, up in the Roggeveld.
1972 A. Scholefield Wild Dog Running 101Oh, aye, the crop. I suppose you’ll have a few stuivers in your purse then, but that’s no living, m’dear.
The smallest monetary unit in use at the Cape under the Dutch East India Company, being the sixth part of a schelling (or skilling) and the forty-eighth part of a rix-dollar, roughly equivalent to a half-penny sterling.
A little; a small amount; something of little value.

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16971981