DSAE test file

settler, noun

Origin:
EnglishShow more Special senses of general English.
1. obsolete. Boer sense 2.
1731 G. Medley tr. of P. Kolben’s Present State of Cape of G.H. II. 76There are but very few Settlers who have not, from their own Vineyards, a plentiful Provision of Wines for themselves.
1809 R. Collins in G.M. Theal Rec. of Cape Col. (1900) VII. 99The wars that were at first waged against the kaffres were carried on exclusively by the settlers, who seem, whenever they have been unsuccesful, to have failed in a great degree from their having considered the recovery of stolen cattle as the principal object of hostility.
2. Often with initial capital.
a. A British settler, especially one of a group of about 4 000 people located on the eastern frontier of the Cape of Good Hope in 1820; setlaar. Also attributive.
1821 G. Barker Journal. 2 Dec.Two settlers at morning worship & a Boer at the afternoon.
1991 F.G. Butler Local Habitation 256The epithet ‘old’ was the worst thing that could be said about a house in Grahamstown...The time when early small buildings would be advertised by estate agents as ‘charming Settler Cottages’ was still some years ahead.
b. combinations
Settlers' Bible, a nickname given to the Graham’s Town Journal, a pro-Settler newspaper published from 1831 to 1919 (now incorporated in Grocott’s Mail);
Settler’s bread, see quotation;
Settlers' City, a nickname given to Grahamstown;
Settler country, the district of Albany, Eastern Cape, between Grahamstown and the sea (but see also quotation 1982);
Settlers' Day historical, the first Monday in September, until 1980 observed as a public holiday commemorating the arrival of the British settlers of 1820.
1861 Queenstown Free Press 23 Oct. (Pettman)Time was when the Settlers’ Bible, the ‘Graham’s Town Journal,’ was the newspaper of the Colony.
1980 Govt Gaz. Vol.180 No.7060, 3The First Schedule to the principal Act is hereby amended..by the deletion of the words ‘Settlers’ Day (first Monday in September)’.
3. derogatory. Especially among members of the Pan Africanist Congress (see PAC):
a. Any white inhabitant of South Africa. Also attributive.
1970 D.M. Sibeko in 10th Anniversary of Sharpeville (P.A.C.) 4From its inception PAC followed the directive of President Sobukwe, to mobilise the African people for a showdown with the settler oppressors.
1993 S. Phama in Daily News 12 Jan. 15The strategic objectives of national liberation have not been realised and so Apla still has a mission to liberate Azania. We say the situation there is settler colonialism.
b. In the slogan one settler, one bullet: a parody of ‘one man, one vote’, used as a political rallying-cry.
1988 P. Lawrence in Saturday Star 9 July 11Similar uncompromising attitudes may be maturing in the camps of the PAC army, the Azanian People’s Liberation Army (Apla). Its recruits are reported to chant a chilling slogan: ‘One settler, one bullet.’
1993 [see toyi-toying toyi-toyi v.].
c. See quotation.
1991 L. Kaunda in Natal Witness 28 Mar. (Echo) 5Asked to define a settler, PAC health secretary Dr Selva Saman said people of Western origin came to Africa and imposed a government on Africans. Anyone who sees himself or herself as part of that establishment, and does not see himself/herself as an African and part of the African constituency, is a settler.
Boer2.
A British settler, especially one of a group of about 4 000 people located on the eastern frontier of the Cape of Good Hope in 1820; setlaar. Also attributive.
Any white inhabitant of South Africa. Also attributive.
a parody of ‘one man, one vote’, used as a political rallying-cry.
See quotation.

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17311993