Lion and Tyger, noun phrase

Forms:
Also Lion and Tiger, and with small initials.
Origin:
DutchShow more Probably translation of Dutch Leeuw en Tijger; see quotation 1798.
historical
In the phrases Lion and Tyger money, Lion and Tyger tax: a per capita tax levied at the Cape, the proceeds being used as prize money to encourage the hunting of predatory game. Also attributive. See also tiger sense 1.
Note:
The tax was instituted by Jan van Riebeeck, who noted it in his Daghregister (16 July 1656) as follows: ‘Is op dato ten aansien het wild gediert aan Compagnies vee dus veel schade doet, bij resolutie goedgevonden tot premie te stellen: voor een leeuw die gevangen off schoten wordt 6 [realen van 8], een tijger off wolff 4, ende een lupert 3 ra van 8.’
[1708 (tr. of F. Leguat) in R. Raven-Hart Cape G.H. 1652–1702 (1971) II. 431The Company gives twenty Crowns to anyone that kills a Lion, and ten to him that kills a Tigre.]
1795 C.R. Hopson tr. of C.P. Thunberg’s Trav. II. 19The farmer continues paying to the Company the old tax, called Lion and Tyger Money..out of which fund, at the time when the colony began to extend itself,..a certain premium was paid to everyone who killed or caught any of these animals.
1797 Earl Macartney in G.M. Theal Rec. of Cape Col. (1898) II. 103The Burgher Senate have represented to me that in order to enable them to levy and collect the annual assessment of Lion and Tyger money, for the supply of the Colony’s fund, they have affixed advertisements requiring all inhabitants of the Cape District that shall have attained their sixteenth year to cause themselves to be entered into the Registers of this Colony.
1798 S.H. Wilcocke tr. of J.S. Stavorinus’s Voy. to E. Indies III. 460A tax was..levied by the Dutch Company, under the denomination of lion and tyger-money; this tax was paid by each burger, at the rate of four rixdollars for lion, and two guilders for tiger-money; out of this fund, at the time when the colony began to extend itself, and when the colonists were much infested by wild beasts, a certain premium was paid to everyone who killed or caught any of these animals.
1806 J. Barrow Trav. II. 104A kind of capitation tax was levied under the name of Lion and Tyger money. The fund so raised was applied to the encouragement of destroying beasts of prey, of which these two were considered as the most formidable.
1951 L.G. Green Grow Lovely 142Rewards were paid on the evidence of skins. The Burgher Council financed all its activities by levying a single tax known as ‘Lion and Tyger money’. Rewards were paid out of this fund.
1990 R. Malan My Traitor’s Heart 14Dutch governors..sent bailiffs to collect the ‘lion and tiger’ tax, the ‘pontoon’ tax, and the quitrent on farmland.
a per capita tax levied at the Cape, the proceeds being used as prize money to encourage the hunting of predatory game. Also attributive.

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17081990