DSAE test file

Lion and Tyger, noun phrase

Forms:
Also Lion and Tiger, and with small initials.
Origin:
DutchShow more Probably translation of Dutch Leeuw en Tijger; see quotation 1798.
historical
In the phrases Lion and Tyger money, Lion and Tyger tax: a per capita tax levied at the Cape, the proceeds being used as prize money to encourage the hunting of predatory game. Also attributive. See also tiger sense 1.
Note:
The tax was instituted by Jan van Riebeeck, who noted it in his Daghregister (16 July 1656) as follows: ‘Is op dato ten aansien het wild gediert aan Compagnies vee dus veel schade doet, bij resolutie goedgevonden tot premie te stellen: voor een leeuw die gevangen off schoten wordt 6 [realen van 8], een tijger off wolff 4, ende een lupert 3 ra van 8.’
[1708 (tr. of F. Leguat) in R. Raven-Hart Cape G.H. 1652–1702 (1971) II. 431The Company gives twenty Crowns to anyone that kills a Lion, and ten to him that kills a Tigre.]
1990 R. Malan My Traitor’s Heart 14Dutch governors..sent bailiffs to collect the ‘lion and tiger’ tax, the ‘pontoon’ tax, and the quitrent on farmland.
a per capita tax levied at the Cape, the proceeds being used as prize money to encourage the hunting of predatory game. Also attributive.

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17081990