kaffir dog, noun phrase

Origin:
English, AfrikaansShow more kaffir + English dog; or perhaps translation of Afrikaans kafferhond.
offensive
1. obsolescent. A tan-coloured, short-haired hunting dog kept by indigenous peoples throughout southern Africa and characterized by its leanness, long tail, sharp muzzle, and drooping ears; kraal dog, see kraal noun sense 5.
1835 T.H. Bowker Journal. 11 JulyCafir dogs attacked the sheep, the guard kills two of them.
1864 S. Turner in D. Child Portrait of Pioneer (1980) 6These Kaffir dogs eat anything; you must not leave your saddle or anything made of leather within their reach or it is gone directly.
1870 C. Hamilton Life & Sport in S.-E. Afr. 61The Kaffir dog is an active, wire-haired, long-nosed hound, which much resembles the lurcher.
1882 Lady F.C. Dixie In Land of Misfortune 69The dust rose in clouds and enveloped us in its choking veil, Kaffir dogs flew out from wayside kraals and barked defiance.
1911 P. Gibbon Margaret Harding 5The Kafir dog is not a demonstrative animal, and his snuffle meant much.
1929 G.P. Lestrade in A.M. Duggan-Cronin Bantu Tribes II. i.‘Kaffir’ dogs abound in Bechuanaland.
1939 S. Cloete Watch for Dawn 14What had he done that he could be teased like this, like a lion surrounded by kaffir dogs?
1943 F.H. Rose Kruger’s Wagon 70The barking of Kaffir dogs, as we call the gaunt, black, smooth-haired, ravenous-looking beasts which the natives use in buck hunting.
1949 H.C. Bosman in S. Gray Makapan’s Caves (1987) 39A yellow kafir dog was yelping excitedly round his black master.
1954 J. Wiles Moon to Play With 5The kaffir dogs were usually out hunting in the long grass and that meant they might be away for days.
1970 Daily Dispatch 30 Jan. 14In the old days they called them ‘kaffir-dogs’ — those yellowish pooches lolling about the kraals yapping at the cattle.
1971 D. Marais in Std Encycl. of Sn Afr. IV. 53Kaffir dogs..vary considerably in coloration, coat and ear carriage, but some characteristics are constant: in their general conformation and slinking gait they strongly resemble jackals...Most of them weigh from 50 to 60 lbs...Usually they live as scavengers in Bantu villages.
1971 [see boerbull].
2. derogatory. A mongrel dog: brak noun2.
1882 S. Heckford Lady Trader in Tvl 61Did she see a half-starved Kaffir dog look in her kitchen door or crawl trembling towards the dresser, it was not ‘Furtseck,’..that she would cry, but..a piece of bread or meat was sure to be offered.
1949 O. Walker Proud Zulu (1951) 97They treat us as Kafir dogs. They whip us — yes, even the sons of Zulu men, they whip.
1973 Beeton & Dorner in Eng. Usage in Sn Afr. Vol.4 No.1, 71Kaffir dog,..mongrel.., usually underfed, maltreated & very thin.
1977 F.G. Butler Karoo Morning 203No trees in these streets. No pavements. And at intervals, communal latrines. And starved ‘kaffir’ dogs.
1979 T. Gutsche There Was a Man 331He had immediately banished all ‘Kaffir dogs’ from the Armoedsvlakte area as they found and distributed bones and carrion.
1989 J. Hobbs Thoughts in Makeshift Mortuary 303Scrawny dogs tied with ropes round their necks to running wires. Kaffir dogs.
A tan-coloured, short-haired hunting dog kept by indigenous peoples throughout southern Africa and characterized by its leanness, long tail, sharp muzzle, and drooping ears; kraal dog, see kraalnoun5.
A mongrel dog: braknoun.
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18351989