juffrou, noun

Forms:
jevrouw, jufferShow more Also jevrouw, juffer, juffero, jufferow, juffrauw, juffrow, jufvrouw, and with initial capital.
Origin:
Afrikaans, DutchShow more Afrikaans, from Dutch jongvrouw, juffrouw (jong young + vrouw woman, madam, miss, mistress, lady).
Note:
‘Juffrou’ was also borrowed into British English directly from Dutch, but is now obsolete.
1. ‘Mistress’, a form of address or reference formerly meaning ‘Mrs’, and now ‘Miss’; a form of address or reference to a school teacher; also used as a title, with a surname; juffroutjie.
1824 W.J. Burchell Trav. II. 118At taking leave, Juffrouw (Mrs.) Vermeulen..repeated her invitation for us to stop there on our return.
a1827 D. Carmichael in W.J. Hooker Botanical Misc. (1831) II. 32I knew that Juffrouw understood as little the meaning of these flowers of rhetoric, as did the poor culprit on whom they were so lavishly bestowed.
1827 G. Thompson Trav. 27In the course of conversation our hostess, the Juffrouw Maré, gave an account of the recent death of one of her relations.
1834 T. Pringle Afr. Sketches 178The Juffrouw Coetzer, sometimes manufactured leather dresses for sale..bespoke a travelling Jacket and trowsers of dressed springbok skin.
1867 E.L. Price Jrnls (1956) 249I suggested they shd. make it (sc. the food) them selves...but they murmured at it, saying that no one cd. make it like Yeffrow Price!
1871 J. Mackenzie Ten Yrs N. of Orange River 15I fancy however, Jufvrouw would prefer the charcoal ‘komfoor’ to a spinning-wheel.
1898 W.C. Scully Vendetta 62Juffrouw du Plessis and her two daughters were sitting in their garden behind the oleander hedge.
1913 C. Pettman Africanderisms 235Juffer or Juffrouw...Juffer is equivalent to the English ‘mistress’.
1919 M. Greenlees tr. of O.F. Mentzel’s Life at Cape in Mid-18th C. 126He drew Mistress van Kerwel, as she stood turning her back upon him, in so natural and realistic a manner that everyone who saw the picture at once exclaimed ‘That’s the jonge Juffrouw!’
1926 P. Smith Beadle (1929) 87If Juffrouw will but tell me where I can find her I will now take her my letter.
1948 V.M. Fitzroy Cabbages & Cream‘You must be reasonable, juffrou,’ the agent said persuasively, ‘what you are asking is more than double the market value of the place.’
1960 J. Cope Tame Ox 92Juffrou du Preez, we black people know this book — do you understand? We have had it for more than a hundred years, two hundred.
1973 J. Cope Alley Cat 96‘You deserve our heartfelt thanks,’..‘I shall mention you to our Church Council. Yours, juffrou, is a work of..’ the voice going jerkily on.
1981 Sunday Times 14 June 9‘He had two passions,’ said a former school teacher, Mrs van Dyk, still called ‘juffrou’ by everyone, ‘education and the mission field’.
2. As a common noun.
a. A young woman; jonge vrouw.
1837 N. Polson Subaltern’s Sick Leave 1104At about two o’clock the Dutch take their siesta and on rising from their beds the coffee or teapot is introduced and kept by the juffrouw’s side till night.
1859 E.L. Layard in Cape Monthly Mag. V. Jan. 27The jufvrouw was busy about the wagon, mynheer had pastured the cattle, and one of the boys was off to the rocks with his fishing-rod.
a1862 J. Ayliff Jrnl of ‘Harry Hastings’ (1963) 25If a poor man goes to the farm house, the juffero (for you know, Hetty, that’s the name for lady or mistress) invites him into the large hall and with her own hands pours him out a cup of tea.
1896 M.A. Carey-Hobson At Home in Tvl 311They had come to live in Pretoria, where the sister of the Jevrouw and some other members of the family lived.
1955 V.M. Fitzroy Dark Bright Land 82A new chemise trimmed with Moravian work that the juffrow had but just completed making.
1955 V.M. Fitzroy Dark Bright Land 240Ample-skirted vrouws would prepare meals, slim juffrows would slip by on errands watched with interest by the young kêrels.
1976 A. Delius Border 322We used to tease him..saying he must have some beautiful juffrauw hidden in the woods.
b. A female teacher.
1980 Het Suid-Western 6 Aug.[A] Six-year-old..this week handcuffed his nursery school principal..‘I let him handcuff me. He was most proud because he had now caught his “juffrou”.’
1984 B. Johnson-Barker in Wynboer June 72To learn to sign his name. If he had the time the next day, he might consider speaking to the juffrou about it.
‘Mistress’, a form of address or reference formerly meaning ‘Mrs’, and now ‘Miss’; a form of address or reference to a school teacher; also used as a title, with a surname; juffroutjie.
A young woman; jonge vrouw.
A female teacher.

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18241984